Lineage Farm CSA Newsletter #7

Twinkle Twinkle little star…
View this email in your browser

Lineage Farm CSA

July 19th

week seven
(4 pm start in Poughkeepsie this week)

Brooklyn:
Saturday June 7th
10:30-12:30
at the
Greenpoint Reformed Church
136 Milton Street, Greenpoint NY

White Plains:
Saturdays
10-12pm
at the
White Plains Presbyterian Church
39 N. Broadway

Scarsdale:
Tuesdays 6/17, 7/1, 7/15, 7/29, 8/12, and 8/26
4:30-7pm
at the
Hitchcock Presbyterian Church,
6 Greenacres Avenue,
Scarsdale, NY 10583

Poughkeepsie:
Tuesdays
4-6:30pm
at the
Jewish Community Center
Grand Avenue
Poughkeepsie, NY

Hudson:
Wednesdays
4:30 to 5:30pm
at
Sam Sutty’s and Son
713 Warren St
Hudson, NY 12534

This week’s share (subject to change) - 
Yukina Savoy (like a summery, savoyed tat soi), Beets, Carrots, Summer Squash, Zucchini, Patty Pan Squash, Cucumbers galore, various Herbs, and more!

Dear Friends, Neighbors, and CSA Members,

The tomatoes are so tall now, I can barely reach up to twine the vine around the trellis.  The plants are heavy with fruit, and several in the lowest bunches starting their first blush.  Sam played for a bit with a green tomato he was able to grab, but no interest in eating it.  Perhaps if it was breaded and fried… 

Remember those eggplants I mentioned recently, expected to swell in the first week of August?  Well, we’re a bit ahead of schedule, and I see many that are going to be harvestable this coming week.  I do love all these deliciously grillable summer fruits.  I haven’t tried grilling cucumbers, though maybe I should, since I’ve heard claims of pineapples being grill-worthy.  Zucchini and eggplants are my mainstay through the hot August days.  Not that it’s been so hot up here.  Oddly cool nights for July, in the 50s, have me doubly surprised to see the eggplants ready so soon.  We did cover them early on with that light weight spun fabric row cover, so I suspect the extra bit of heat in their youth gave them a boost.  Hopefully there’s no damage from the nightly 50s.

We’re trying out a new pepper this year, along with our standard bells and Italian fryers – Shishito peppers will come to grace your pick up tables soon, a skinny thin walled green pepper that scalds easily, making it great for grilling, sauteeing hole, or broiling, for a tasty treat.  I’ve heard it refered to as better than french fries, and a great finger food to impress your friends at your next hors d’oeuvres party.

I’m going to try to figure out how to invite all of you to the new(ish) Facebook Group – or if you have another idea for how all members can converse online, to swap recipes and ask questions, please fill me in!  I’m wondering, what’s your favorite cookbook these days?  Mine is Nourished Kitchens.  Lovely salad and vegetable and ferment recipes, and I just made the most delicious Cider Brined Roast Chicken of my life last night.  What have you made recently?

With a second tooth,
Your farmers,
Jen, Jon, and Baby Sam

Roasted Beet Hummus
Super creamy roasted beet hummus featuring a whole roasted beet, lemon, plenty of garlic flavor. Perfect with chips, pita, veggies or as a sandwich spread.

Serves: 6
Ingredients
  • 1 small roasted beet
  • 1 15 oz. can (1 3/4 cup) cooked chickpeas, mostly drained
  • zest of one large lemon
  • juice of half a large lemon
  • healthy pinch salt and black pepper
  • 2 large cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 heaping Tbsp tahini
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375°F, remove the stem and most of the root from your beets, and scrub and wash them underwater until clean.
  2. Wrap beets in foil, drizzle on a bit of canola oil, wrap tightly, and roast for one hour or until a knife inserted falls out without resistance. They should be tender. Set in the fridge (in a bowl to catch juice) to cool to room temperature.
  3. Once your beet is cooled and peeled, quarter it and place it in your food processor. Blend until only small bits remain.
  4. Add remaining ingredients except for olive oil and blend until smooth.
  5. Drizzle in olive oil as the hummus is mixing.
  6. Taste and adjust seasonings as needed, adding more salt, lemon juice or olive oil if needed. If it’s too thick, add a bit of water.
  7. Will keep in the fridge for up to a week.

Vegan Beet Cupcakes
Fudgy vegan cupcakes with pureed roasted beets and a dusting of cocoa powder.
Author: Minimalist Baker

 

Serves: 10 cupcakes
Ingredients
  • 2 medium beets
  • 1 cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk
  • 1 tsp white or apple cider vinegar
  • 
3/4 cup raw turbinado OR granulated sugar
  • 1/4 cup canola or melted coconut oil
  • 2 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • 1 cup + 1 heaping Tbsp whole wheat pastry flour or unbleached all-purpose flour
  • scant 1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
 + more for topping
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • pinch salt
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375°F, remove the stem and most of the root from your beets, and scrub and wash them underwater until clean.
  2. Wrap beets in foil, drizzle on a bit of canola oil, wrap tightly, and roast for one hour or until a knife inserted falls out without resistance. They should be tender. Set in the fridge (in a bowl to catch juice) to cool to room temperature.
  3. Once cooled, either finely grate or puree beets in a blender (adding orange juice or water to encourage mixing). Measure out 1/2 cup and set aside.
  4. Line a muffin pan with paper liners.
  5. Whisk together the almond milk and vinegar in a large bowl, and set aside for a few minutes to curdle. Add the sugar, oil, vanilla extract, and 1/2 cup beets and beat until foamy.
  6. Add the flour, cocoa powder, baking soda, baking powder, and salt to a sifter and slowly sift it into the wet ingredients while mixing with a hand-held or standing mixer. Beat until no large lumps remain.
  7. Pour batter into liners, filling 3/4 of the way full. Bake 22 to 25 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Transfer to a cooling rack and let cool completely. Do not try and unwrap them or they’ll stick to the wrapper.
  8. Once cooled, dust with cocoa powder and store in an airtight container to keep fresh.
Tzatziki/Cucumber Dill Yogurt Sauce

  • 2 cups plain yogurt
  • 1 cucumber, unpeeled, halved lengthwise, seeded, grated
  • 1 tablespoon coarse salt
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons minced fresh dill
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 6 pita breads, cut horizontally in half, then cut into wedges
  • Olive oil

Preparation

Line sieve with cheesecloth and place over medium bowl. Place yogurt in sieve. Cover with plastic wrap and allow to drain in refrigerator overnight.

Mix cucumber and 1 tablespoon salt in small bowl; cover and chill 3 hours.

Transfer drained yogurt to another bowl. Mix in sour cream, lemon juice, dill and garlic. Squeeze out as much excess liquid as possible from cucumber. Stir cucumber into yogurt. Season with pepper. Cover; chill at least 2 hours. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Keep refrigerated.)

Preheat oven to 400°F. Place pita wedges on baking sheets. Brush with olive oil. Bake until crisp, about 10 minutes. Cool. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Store pita airtight at room temperature.) Serve cucumber dip with baked pita wedges.

Share
Tweet
Forward
+1
Share
Read Later
Facebook
Facebook
Website
Website
Copyright © 2014 Lineage Farm CSA, All rights reserved.
Thanks for joining our CSA for the 2014 season!Our mailing address is:

Lineage Farm CSA

520 Clinton St.

Hudson, Ny 12534


Email Marketing Powered by MailChimp

 

 

Lineage Farm CSA Newsletter #6


Out came the sun
and dried up all the rain
and the itsy bitsy spider climbed up the spout again.
View this email in your browser

Lineage Farm CSA

July 12th

week six
(EARLY  3pm start in Poughkeepsie this week)

Brooklyn:
Saturday June 7th
10:30-12:30
at the
Greenpoint Reformed Church
136 Milton Street, Greenpoint NY
White Plains:
Saturdays
10-12pm
at the
White Plains Presbyterian Church
39 N. Broadway
Scarsdale:
Tuesdays 6/17, 7/1, 7/15, 7/29, 8/12, and 8/26
4:30-7pm
at the
Hitchcock Presbyterian Church,
6 Greenacres Avenue,
Scarsdale, NY 10583
Poughkeepsie:
Tuesdays
 4-6:30pm
at the
Jewish Community Center
Grand Avenue
Poughkeepsie, NY
Hudson:
Wednesdays
4:30 to 5:30pm
at
Sam Sutty's and Son
713 Warren St
Hudson, NY 12534

 

This week's share (subject to change) - 
Beets, Carrots, Summer Squash, Zucchini, Patty Pan Squash, Komatsuna, Cucumbers, various Herbs, fresh Garlic, and more!

Dear Friends, Neighbors, and CSA Members,
Sam has been plowing his way through the cucumbers this week. He has even swallowed some bits of them, though mostly, of course, he ends up covered in cucumber juice and seeds, with loads of smiles and laughs.  And one tiny tip of a razor sharp tooth has emerged!

The fruits continue to shape up.  We've found mini eggplants, on their way to fruition, approximately 3 weeks from now.  The tomatoes are looking dreamy, cluster after cluster of big beautiful globes.  And the peppers are setting fruit as well, another couple weeks and we'll likely send down green peppers.  We harvest the first flush of peppers green; they say it helps the plant to be able to nourish the following fruit sets to full mature color, without blossom end rot.

The deer have sadly mowed down our latest lettuce crop.  If we're able to send any lettuce at all, it will likely be smaller heads that we pick early, so the deer don't take it out from under our noses.  On the other hand, the summer asian greens- braising mix, Komatsuna, yukina savoy – are all looking savory, lush,  delicious, and deer-free.

Broccoli joined our share for the first time last week.  As a garden plant, it requires a high amount of fertility, which we have been working up to with our soil.  It is my hope that you enjoyed them, though the heads were significantly smaller than we had hoped (thus the banding together of several heads).  If you have any feedback, please do let us know, whether about the broccoli or any other item we've served up.  And we'll keep working to make the fall broccoli crop head up more beautifully and bountifully.

Climbing up the spout again,
Your farmers,
Jen, Jon, and Baby Sam

 

Spiced Greens with Raisins

A simple braising recipe for all those greens, from Brooklyn Member Ellen (hope I'm remembering this right!)-

Heat oil in saute pan.
Add whole hot pepper, onions if you'd like.
Add raisins and chopped greens to pan.
Add broth to steam greens and plump raisins.
Enjoy!

I don’t hesitate to say that damage or destruction of the land-community is morally wrong, just as Leopold did not hesitate to say so when he was composing his essay, “The Land Ethic,” in 1947. But I do not believe, as I think Leopold did not, that morality, even religious morality, is an adequate motive for good care of the land-community. The primary motive for good care and good use is always going to be affection, because affection involves us entirely. And here Leopold himself set the example. In 1935 he bought an exhausted Wisconsin farm and, with his family, began its restoration. To do this was morally right, of course, but the motive was affection.
- Wendell Berry, Jefferson Lecture
Share
Tweet
Forward
+1
Share
Read Later
Facebook
Facebook
Website
Website
Copyright © 2014 Lineage Farm CSA, All rights reserved.
Thanks for joining our CSA for the 2014 season!

Our mailing address is:

Lineage Farm CSA
520 Clinton St.

Hudson, Ny 12534

Email Marketing Powered by MailChimp