Lineage Farm CSA Newsletter #20

Sammy, Sammy, give me your answer true.
Is it naptime, or will you wait till two?
It seems like you must have jet lag,
You slept ’til 8, I’m so glad.
Oh you’d look sweet, upon the seat
of a tricycle built for two!
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Lineage Farm CSA

October 17, 2014

week nineteen!
(early 3pm start in Poughkeepsie this week)
Fresh Young Local Ginger!
Sold Out, but don’t forget to pick yours up (if you ordered)!

This Week’s Harvest:

Pea Shoots, Potatoes, Carrots, Rutabagas, Daikon Radishes, Turnips, Kale, Collards,Garlic, Herbs and more!

Dear CSA Members, Neighbors, Friends, Family,

There stands a chance of frost this weekend.  Timely as ever, despite the surrounding warm days, temperatures are starting to drop towards winter.  Eggplant season is certainly over, and I had hoped to get out today and harvest all remaining sweet peppers that we might share them for just one more week…

 

Sam has different plans, though.  Poor guy just suffered through a couple days of low-grade fever, and while the fever has broken he still seems disgruntled, pale, and bothered by some unnameable bother.  Moments of peace shine through, when he’ll laugh and smile and play ball.  It seems, in those moments, that his voice sings clearer, that he is trying out new noises and combinations.  Most moments, though, have sounded pretty miserable, so we’re paying a visit to our pediatrician instead of to our sweet peppers.  Hopefully, Sam is fine and the frost won’t take out the peppers tonight.  (update – doc says it may have been a virus but Sam’s a-ok now, besides the ever present haunting of cutting teeth.)

I also hope that the Collards will take the frost better than they did last year.  And it seems I may be fairly lonely in that hope – what’s with the general disdain for collards???  They are so simple to prepare, so tasty, and so very good for us, why leave them behind?  I go for an easy chop, steam, eat and find they’re a winner every time.  Count this as heavy encouragement to try some next week.  Heck, even Whole Foods is behind this movement – I read on their paper grocery bags last weekend that “Collards are the new Kale.”  Super high in Vitamin K, loaded with other nutrients, best of all the common cruciferous veggies for cholesterol-lowering and cancer prevention, I ask again, what’s not to like?


Jon has been incredibly productive while we were in NOLA, and later while I stuck around the house with a fevery Sam.  Five beds of garlic planted (thank you to all those folks with sore fingers for breaking apart the garlic heads!), OGRIN wheat trials seeded, celeriac stored for the coming few distributions, sweet potatoes curing, carrots in the cooler, and a two season long trial trying to fix our tiniest tractor brought to a close!  Know anyone looking for an Allis-Chalmers G?  Renowned as a fantastic cultivating tractor, it just gave Jon a few too many rough turns.  Now that it is actually finally fixed, we’ve figured out different methods and tools for cultivation and are ready for it to hit the road.

 

The trees have also been busy.  If you were hoping to make it up north for some foliage, best come straight away.  The colors are still lovely, but dropping quickly.  There are many more bare branches than there were a week ago.  Winter, and rest, are fast approaching.  Please consider signing up for next season soon, either in full or with a deposit, to help support our work over the winter!  Beyond the many hours we will spend planning next year’s garden and looking for new members (and tracking down all you established members!), Jon is also looking forward to having time alone with his welder, building a root harvester for carrots and the like, and perfecting his bed shaper.  And I am looking forward to celebrating Sam’s first birthday, come December!

 

In the Collards and the Carrots,
Your Farmers,
Jen, Jon, and baby Sam

Check out some info on Collards while you’re on here…
http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=138

from “The World’s Healthiest Foods”

Tips for Preparing Collard Greens

Rinse collard greens under cold running water. Chop leaf portion into 1/2-inch slices and the stems into 1/4-inch pieces for quick and even cooking.

To get the most health benefits from collard greens, we recommend letting them sit for a minimum of 5 minutes before cooking. Sprinkling with lemon juice before letting them sit may be able to help activate their myrosinase enzymes and increase formation of beneficial isothiocyanates in the greens.

The Healthiest Way of Cooking Collard Greens

We recommend Healthy Steaming collard greens for maximum nutrition and flavor. Fill the bottom of a steamer pot with 2 inches of water. While waiting for the water to come to a rapid boil chop greens. Steam for 5 minutes and toss with our Mediterranean Dressing and top with your favorite optional ingredients. For details see 5-Minute Collard Greens.

How to Enjoy

A Few Quick Serving Ideas
  • Serve steamed collard greens with black-eyed peas and brown rice for a Southern-inspired meal.
  • Use lightly steamed, cooled, and chopped collard greens as a filling in your sushi vegetable rolls.
WHFoods Recipes That Feature Collard Greens
Dawn

the hollow vastness of the sky
with metallic clinkings–

beating color up into it
at a far edge,–beating it, beating it
with rising, triumphant ardor,–
stirring it into warmth,
quickening in it a spreading change,–
bursting wildly against it as
dividing the horizon, a heavy sun
lifts himself–is lifted–
bit by bit above the edge
of things,–runs free at last
out into the open–!lumbering
glorified in full release upward–
songs cease.

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Copyright © 2014 Lineage Farm CSA, All rights reserved.
Thanks for joining our CSA for the 2014 season!Our mailing address is:

Lineage Farm CSA

520 Clinton St.

Hudson, Ny 12534

 

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Lineage Farm CSA Newsletter #19


L'automne est une chanson de pluie
Ouvre donc
Ouvre donc
Ton parapluie
Ton parapluie.
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Lineage Farm CSA

October 9, 2014

week nineteen!
(4pm start in Poughkeepsie this week)

 
 
Fresh Young Local Ginger!
Order now, for delivery October 18th and 21st!

This Week's Harvest:

Potatoes, Carrots, Daikon Radishes, Tat Soi, Mustard Greens, Kale, Collards, Cabbage,Garlic, Herbs and more!
 

 

GINGER ORDERS:

'Tis the season – for Fresh Young Local Organic Ginger!  From our friends at Etc. Farm in Ghent, NY, we bring you one of the few tropical plants grown in the Northeast.  Not like the cured ginger you'll find in stores – you can use the stalks and leaves too!  (see photo above and below) Young ginger is less fibrous and does not have the brown skin you find on the ginger in stores, from far south of here.  Check out this website for some more information, plus tips on how to store and use young ginger – http://www.oldfriendsfarm.com/our-fresh-ginger.html

Order NOW by email – lineagefarm@riseup.net, subject line GINGER.  There is only 15 pounds left, and this year's ginger add-on is first ordered first served until the harvest runs out.  I will accept orders until Wednesday October 15th, or until the harvest is all spoken for, whichever happens first.  Please bring checks made out to Lineage Farm when you pick up your Ginger either Saturday October 18th, Tuesday October 21st, or Wednesday October 22nd.  Order by the pound (or half), we will get it as close to your order weight as possible.  $13/pound, for members.  $16/pound, non-members.

Dear CSA Members, Neighbors, Friends, Family,
My sniffles are about dried up, and Sam never even hinted at catching my cold, which is good news – we're headed to New Orleans for the weekend!  A good friend of mine is getting married, so Sam and I are going to re-live summertime with highs in the 80s and bright southern sunny skies.  Wish us luck – it's Sam's first plane ride, my first as a mom, and thinking about getting us both to the gate on time with luggage in tow makes my head spin.  As much as I'm looking forward to being there, I greatly dislike thinking about getting there!  The garden seems such a haven of quiet, serene refuge right now…
 

We've dug up a few hundred pounds of storage carrots this week, filling up our cooler with late season crops, to save them from the deer.  Luckily, deer don't seem the least bit interested in celeriac and cabbage, both of which are looking fabulous.  This is the week of some serious transition, for those of you still clinging to summer's nightshades.  The eggplants have pretty much stopped growing, the sweet peppers are petering out, and the tomatoes are so done they're not even in the ground anymore.  Jon is doing a phenomenal job with putting the garden to sleep, as cover crops of buckwheat, oats and peas, and rye stand several inches to a couple feet tall over the veggie-less beds.  Besides seeding all the quick growing greens (arugula, baby kale, baby bok choi, mache, spinach), there's not much left but to haul loads of sweet potatoes, celeriac, more carrots and beets out of the fields.  This year's collards are fantastic, the size of elephant ears yet tender as a dream.  I highly recommend them.  And I've included a recipe for mustard greens that really delighted my taste buds.
 

The last time I was in Brooklyn, one member who is a mom of a toddler, told me the story of her morning.  Though she had intended to get to the CSA pick up early, her child had other ideas.  Multiple bouts of joyful running and flinging of small items (lentils, cereal…) about the house, followed by dutiful cleaning by mom, led to her early arrival turning into a last minute rush to make it before the last items were  bagged up for the soup kitchen.  She did get her vegetables, fortunately.  And while I don't doubt that there will be times for me when Sam's antics don't feel terribly amusing, and while already there are days when my two minutes to get out the door become half an hour trying to change Sam's diaper (again) as he crawls away, and while it can then take another 15 minutes just to get pants back on the kicker, I find myself utterly delighted at the thought that someday Sam too will run around the house flinging whatever comes to hand. 

Watching him grow from utterly prone and unable to turn over, to adeptly crawling through the garden beds, to striving mightily through the process of becoming ever more vertical (he can now reach the third shelf!) leaves me amazed and in awe.  Not just of him, but of every single human being ever.  Whatever form it takes, whatever obstacles or hindrances faced, the process unfolding just blows my mind.  And besides all that, babies learning to stand are just fantastic dancers.

Your Farmers,
Jen, Jon, and Baby Sam

Lentils with Mustard Greens
As Jenny McGruther says in my favorite cookbook Nourished Kitchen, lentils go well with pork, and pork goes well with greens.  Of course, you don't need my permission to skip or substitute for the pork (and lard), but I didn't regret a single bite.  Soaking the lentils increases mineral availability, but does take some advance planning.

Ingredients:
1 cup French green lentils
2 Tablespoons mustard seeds
1 Tbl lard or extra virgin olive oil
1 onion, thinly sliced
8 ounces fresh Italian style pork sausages, casings removed
2 bunches mustard greens (about 16 ounces), sliced into ribbons about 1/4 inch thick
Balsamic vinegar, to serve
Sea salt and pepper, to taste

Directions:
Pour the lentils into a mixing bowl.  Pour in warm water to cover by 2 inches.  Cover the bowl with a kitchen towel, set it in a warm spot on your kitchen counter, and allow the lentils to soak for 8 to 12 hours.

Drain lentils and rinse them well.  Pour them into a heavy stockpot and cover with fresh water by 2 inches.  Bring to a boil over medium-high heat; reduce heat to low and simmer, uncovered, for 45 minutes or until soft and tender.  Drain and set aside in a bowl.

Heat a very wide skillet over high heat.  When very hot, toast the mustard seeds until fragrant and beginning to brown (she says 2 minutes, mine only took 30 seconds).  Decrease the heat to medium and add the lard to the pan.  Once the lard melts, stir in the onion and fry it until it begins to brown a bit at the edges, about 5 minutes.  Stir in the sausage and continue stirring until cooked through and browned, about 8 minutes.  Pour in the lentils and stir them into the sausage and onions until warmed through. 

Turn off the heat, stir in the mustard greens, and cover the skillet.  Allow the greens to wilt, undisturbed, in the residual heat of the skillet for about 5 minutes.  Uncover and stir once again.  Serve with a drizzle of balsamic vinegar (I forgot this part and it still tasted lovely) and a sprinkling of salt and pepper.

If you're feeling more like a stew, check out her similar recipe for lentils and mustard green stew –

 

A Great Need
 
Out
 
Of a great need
 
We are all holding hands
 
And climbing.
 
Not loving is a letting go.
 
Listen,
 
The terrain around here
 
Is
 
Far too
 
Dangerous
 
For
 
That.

-Hafiz-

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Copyright © 2014 Lineage Farm CSA, All rights reserved.
Thanks for joining our CSA for the 2014 season!

Our mailing address is:

Lineage Farm CSA
520 Clinton St.

Hudson, Ny 12534

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