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Lineage Farm CSA Newsletter #11


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Lineage Farm CSA

August 16th

week eleven
(4 pm start in Poughkeepsie this week)

Brooklyn:
Saturday June 7th
10:30-12:30
at the

Greenpoint Reformed Church
136 Milton Street, Greenpoint NY

White Plains:
Saturdays
10-12pm
at the
White Plains Presbyterian Church
39 N. Broadway

Scarsdale:
Tuesdays 6/17, 7/1, 7/15, 7/29, 8/12, and 8/26
4:30-7pm
at the
Hitchcock Presbyterian Church,
6 Greenacres Avenue,

Scarsdale, NY 10583

Poughkeepsie:
Tuesdays
 4-6:30pm
at the
Jewish Community Center
Grand Avenue
Poughkeepsie, NY

Hudson:
Wednesdays
4:30 to 5:30pm
at
Sam Sutty's and Son
713 Warren St

Hudson, NY 12534

This Week's Harvest:
Leeks!, Tomatoes!, Eggplants, Peppers, Lettuce Heads, Carrots, Beets, Summer Squash, Cucumbers, Dill, and more!

 

Maple Syrup Orders have arrived.
Dear Friends, Neighbors, CSA Members

Summer nights are coming in chilly this year.  Sam's been wearing long sleeves and pants all week, and today I even closed our bedroom window for the chill.  Is it climate change, is it just an odd year, or even maybe it's both?  Seems like every year has been a bit "odd" since I started farming, and paying more attention than back when I was in a climate controlled office job.  So what is "normal" weather these days, anyone?

Late Tuesday evening, on the way back from Scarsdale, somebody side-swiped our van.  Luckily, no one was hurt, but our feelings (and pocketbooks) sure were when the guy drove off without exchanging any ID or insurance information.  That's twice in two years this van has been the victim of a hit and run!

On the up-side, if not also the odd-side, we just ate the first of our vine ripened winter squashes.  I've decided the better name for these earlier, smaller varieties would be autumn squash, especially with how autumnal the weather has been feeling these past days.  Just as the summer squashes are winding down and out, the delicatas and other smaller squashes come to bear.  I believe the varietal name of the one we ate is "hooligan," though it seemed no trickster or delinquent to me.  Quite tasty, actually.  We'll be harvesting those next week, and starting to send them your way soon after.  Still keeping the potatoes on the back burners, waiting for the tops to die back before we start digging.  Those tubers'll keep growing so long as there's green above ground, so hopefully that means we'll be unearthing some big beauties this year.

 You may have noticed, in the photos from last week, that we bought a new tractor.  No longer does it take two days, sore knees and a roughed up back to ready a couple acres.  The other day, it only took Jon two hours!  It drives like a dream, and has enough power not only to handle the tasks we need it to now, but should be able to handle the tasks we will be growing into in the years to come!

We have more transitioning news – and it's a big one.  We've been given one more year on the land we currently lease.  Jon's cousins are simply itching to be farming there themselves, again (they make hay).  We've got our eye on a lovely property right outside of Hudson, replete with barns (room for an indoor wash station/packing shed, electricity and plumbing!!!), a carriage house in poor/fairish condition, and machine shed, a pond, and some lovely vegetable soil.  We're busy working out how to pay for it – applying for a mortgage, a bridging grant, and to sell the development rights for a conservation easement.  Keep your fingers crossed for us, this could be a dream come true.

Wishing upon a star,
Your farmers,
Jen, Jon, and Baby Sam

“You did everything possible to bury me
But you forgot that I am a seed”

Dinos Christianopoulos, greek poet
 

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Copyright © 2014 Lineage Farm CSA, All rights reserved.
Thanks for joining our CSA for the 2014 season!

Our mailing address is:

Lineage Farm CSA
520 Clinton St.

Hudson, Ny 12534

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Lineage Farm CSA Newsletter #10

Open, shut them, open, shut them

Give a little clap

Open, shut them, open, shut them

Lay them in your lap.

Lineage Farm CSA

August 9th

week ten
(early 3 pm start in Poughkeepsie this week)

Brooklyn:
Saturday June 7th
10:30-12:30
at the

Greenpoint Reformed Church
136 Milton Street, Greenpoint NY

White Plains:
Saturdays
10-12pm
at the
White Plains Presbyterian Church
39 N. Broadway

Scarsdale:
Tuesdays 6/17, 7/1, 7/15, 7/29, 8/12, and 8/26
4:30-7pm
at the
Hitchcock Presbyterian Church,
6 Greenacres Avenue,

Scarsdale, NY 10583

Poughkeepsie:
Tuesdays
4-6:30pm
at the
Jewish Community Center
Grand Avenue
Poughkeepsie, NY

Hudson:
Wednesdays
4:30 to 5:30pm
at
Sam Sutty’s and Son
713 Warren St

Hudson, NY 12534

This Week’s Harvest:
Solanacea, Cucurbita Pepo, Lactuca, Beta Vulgaris, Daucus Carota, Cucumis Sativus, Allium Sativum, Brassica rapa Komatsuna, Abelmoschus esculentus, Lycopersicon esculentum, and basil.

Dear Friends, Neighbors, CSA Members

In the name of sleep deprivation, I am taking this opportunity to share the week in photo form, instead of formulating paragraphs.  Enjoy!

Worth a thousand words,
From,

Your farmers,
Jen, Jon, and Baby Sam

Okra flowers are always so pretty.
And the oregano in flower is pretty, as well, with tiny blossoms ranging from pale lavender to deep purple.  Only a few herb plants flowered, the rest we’ve been able to harvest often enough to keep it from bolting.
Each site has its own character(s)…Poughkeepsie’s first August pickup (looking for vanilla ice cream)
Brooklyn’s late July distribution, piled high!
This Tomato Hornworm is a handsome devil, set to eat up all the tomato leaves in a steady and not so slow pace.
Lucky for us, the parasitic braconid wasps are on the prowl: this Tomato Hornworm is not quite so handsome, with thousands of wasp eggs sprouting out of its back.  Once the eggs hatch, bye bye hornworm!
What better time to nap than right now?
And after the nap, all smiles.
Hey, check out those teeth!
Storm’s a brewing – it’s been a wet season.  Our soil has handled it well, with only minor flooding.
Menacing clouds don’t stop us from piling up the pulled weeds – at least, not until the lightning and thunder show up to high-tail us outta there.  Neighborly farmer Aliyah of Ironwood Farm gives us a hand cleaning out the fall Kale and Broccoli beds.
Photo by Fumie Ishii.  The happy couple…
Photo by Fumie Ishii.  On our brand new Kubota Tractor!  It drives like a charm, so smooth we didn’t know what we were missing, getting jolted around with our old Ford.  Ahh, the joys of actually being able to chisel plow or disc without jarring your knees and teeth out.
Photo by Fumie Ishii.  Carmine, Jon’s father, wins the eggplant face look-a-like contest.  Wish I had a profile portrait of these two – this eggplant really does have a nose!
Ratatouille

Ingredients

1/4 cup olive oil, plus more as needed
1 1/2 cups small diced yellow onion
1 teaspoon minced garlic
2 cups medium diced eggplant, skin on
1/2 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves
1 cup diced green bell peppers
1 cup diced red bell peppers
1 cup diced zucchini squash
1 cup diced yellow squash
1 1/2 cups peeled, seeded and chopped tomatoes
1 tablespoon thinly sliced fresh basil leaves
1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley leaves
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions

Set a large 12-inch saute pan over medium heat and add the olive oil. Once hot, add the onions and garlic to the pan. Cook the onions, stirring occasionally, until they are wilted and lightly caramelized, about 5 to 7 minutes. Add the eggplant and thyme to the pan and continue to cook, stirring occasionally, until the eggplant is partially cooked, about 5 minutes. Add the green and red peppers, zucchini, and squash and continue to cook for an additional 5 minutes. Add the tomatoes, basil, parsley, and salt and pepper, to taste, and cook for a final 5 minutes. Stir well to blend and serve either hot or at room temperature.

Read more at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ratatouille-recipe0.html?oc=linkback

“In order for agriculture to be sustainable, the soil must be attentively cared for.  Not only does the soil need to be respected and conserved, it must be enlivened, regenerated and developed.  This is an ongoing endeavour.  Through the miracle of photosynthesis, the activity of the sun, and the formative forces of the universe, plants create living substances from the mineral kingdom.  Drawing carbon dioxide and nitrogen from the atmosphere as well as from water, the plant enlivens the soil by its root secretions (rhizospheres), and in living soil this activity produces an increase in humic levels (microbial humus)….We must never forget that the fundamental aim of biodynamic agriculture is the production of quality nutrition, whilst respecting nature’s kingdoms and the creatures that live in it.  The earth, nutrition and human beings are therefore completely intertwined.”
A Biodynamic Manual, 2nd Edition, Pierre Masson
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Copyright © 2014 Lineage Farm CSA, All rights reserved.
Thanks for joining our CSA for the 2014 season!Our mailing address is:

Lineage Farm CSA

520 Clinton St.

Hudson, Ny 12534

 

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