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Lipneage Farm CSA Newsletter #8


Twinkle Twinkle little star…
 
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Lineage Farm CSA

July 26th

week eight
(EARLY 3 pm start in Poughkeepsie this week)

Brooklyn:
Saturday June 7th
10:30-12:30
at the
Greenpoint Reformed Church
136 Milton Street, Greenpoint NY

White Plains:
Saturdays
10-12pm
at the
White Plains Presbyterian Church
39 N. Broadway

Scarsdale:
Tuesdays 6/17, 7/1, 7/15, 7/29, 8/12, and 8/26
4:30-7pm
at the
Hitchcock Presbyterian Church,
6 Greenacres Avenue,
Scarsdale, NY 10583

Poughkeepsie:
Tuesdays
 4-6:30pm
at the
Jewish Community Center
Grand Avenue
Poughkeepsie, NY

Hudson:
Wednesdays
4:30 to 5:30pm
at
Sam Sutty's and Son
713 Warren St
Hudson, NY 12534

 

This week's share (subject to change) - 
Yukina Savoy (like a summery, savoyed tat soi), Komatsuna (Asian green delicious as a salad or cooked like spinach), Carrots, Summer Squash, Zucchini, Patty Pan Squash, Eggplant, Cucumbers galore, various Herbs, and more!

Dear Friends, Neighbors, and CSA Members,

A busy week, to say the least.  We pulled all the garlic on Monday; it's set to cure in our shaded greenhouse for the next couple weeks.  We cultivated and hand weeded our fall storage carrots (that time already!), which are currently less than an inch tall.  We cleaned out some of the spring greens beds, getting ready for end of the season radish, spinach, and beet plantings.  Elizabeth from OGRIN visited Tuesday afternoon with her walk behind reaper-binder to help Jon harvest the four varieties of wheat seed we grew for them.  Jon borrowed Miller's Crossing's Farm's combine to harvest the acre of heirloom rye and Banatka wheat we grew behind our greenhouse.  And we enjoyed a lovely thunderstorm, which brought a delightfully pleasant, cool Thursday after one seriously sweaty Wednesday.

Sam is trying his mightiest to start crawling.  He'll pull himself forward from a seated position, rocking back and forth until he can shoot his legs backwards and end up on his hands and knees.  More often than not, he'll keep sending his legs backwards so that he's just hold himself up on his hands and belly, and starts scooting himself backwards, at which point he'll start calling us for reinforcements, as this was clearly not what he pictured happening!

Summer's bounty is revealing itself to us, as the tomatoes and peppers continue to ripen, and eggplant has made it into our meals almost once a day this entire week – grilled, sauteed, in eggplant parm and ratatouille and even a curry.  Thus the beauty of Farmers' Prerogative – while we generally glean our weekly vegetables from what's left at the end of the Brooklyn (Saturday) and Hudson (Wednesday) pick-ups, we've definitely taken some pretty serious dibs on the eggplant this week!  Of course, every single one of those dishes got some Summer Squash or Zucchini in there too.  We're definitely swimming in the fruits!

Don't forget to order your Maple Syrup by the end of July – you should have received an email with details earlier this week.  If not, or if you've got any questions, let us know – lineagefarm@riseup.net

From the waves of amber grains
Your farmers,
Jen, Jon, and Baby Sam

Eggplant Parm

Here’s a version with the vegetables and meat grilled or broiled instead of breaded and fried. You can skip the chicken if you like, and add other vegetables, like zucchini and portobello mushrooms; just grill them and layer on top of the eggplant and before the cheese.

For a simple vegetable gratin, omit the tomato sauce and layer any cooked vegetable you like (asparagus, broccoli, cauliflower, artichoke hearts, potatoes, fennel, leeks, spinach, onions, celery root, parsnips, Jerusalem artichokes, winter squash, or sweet potatoes) with the cheese (Gruyère and Swiss are nice alternatives). Finish with the seasoned bread crumb topping for a most excellent crust.

Yield: 4 to 6 servings Time: About 1 hour

2 or 3 eggplants (about 2 pounds total), unpeeled, and cut crosswise into 1/2-inch slices
Salt
1 tablespoon olive oil, plus more for brushing
Freshly ground black pepper
About 1/2 pound boneless, skinless white meat chicken (breast, cutlets, or tenders), pounded to uniform thickness if necessary and blotted dry
4 cups All-Purpose Tomato Sauce (see below)
1 cup grated Parmesan cheese, plus more if you like
About 30 fresh basil leaves
2 ounces grated or torn mozzarella cheese (optional)
1 cup bread crumbs
  1. If the eggplant is particularly large or full of seeds, sprinkle it with salt and set in a colander for at least 15 and up to 60 minutes. Rinse and pat dry. Heat the oven to 400°F. Heat a charcoal or gas grill, or the broiler, and move the rack to about 4 inches from the heat source. (You can also use a stovetop grill pan here, heated over medium-high heat.)
  2. Brush the eggplant lightly on both sides with some oil and sprinkle with salt (if you didn’t salt it earlier) and pepper. Grill or broil until browned on both sides, turning once or twice and brushing with more oil if the eggplant looks dry. The idea is to keep the eggplant cooking steadily without burning, so adjust the heat and position as needed. The eggplant is usually ready in somewhere between 5 and 10 minutes. When done, set eggplant slices aside.
  3. Cut the chicken so you have 8 or so large pieces. Pound or press them a bit so they’re evenly flat. Brush them all over with some oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Grill or broil the chicken, turning once, no more than 3 minutes per side (to check for doneness, cut into a piece with a thin-bladed knife; the center should still be slightly pink). Set the chicken aside.
  4. Lightly oil a 2-quart baking dish, then spoon a layer of the tomato sauce into the bottom. Top with a layer of eggplant, then a sprinkling of Parmesan, then a layer of chicken, and finally a few basil leaves. Repeat until all the ingredients are used. (There will probably be sauce left over; warm it up to pass at the table.) Toss the remaining Parmesan with the bread crumbs, and the mozzarella if you’re using it. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon of olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, then toss again. Spread the bread crumb mixture evenly on top of the mozzarella. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes, or until the dish is bubbling hot. Serve hot or warm.

All-Purpose Tomato Sauce

Makes: 6 to 8 servings (about 1 quart)
Time: 30 minutes

1/4 cup olive oil
1 large onion or 2 medium onions, chopped
About 4 pounds canned whole tomatoes (two 28- or 35-ounce cans), chopped, liquid reserved
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley or basil leaves (optional)

  1. Put the olive oil in a pot over medium heat. When the oil is hot, add the onions, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and cook, stirring occasionally, until soft, about 3 minutes. Then add the tomatoes.
  2. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the tomatoes break down and the mixture comes together and thickens a bit, 10 to 15 minutes. For a thinner sauce, add some or all of the reserved liquid and cook for another 5 to 10 minutes; if you want a thick sauce, save it for another use. Taste, adjust the seasonings, and stir in the herbs before using. (You can also let the sauce cool, cover, and refrigerate for up to several days.)
"We don't live by bread alone.  We are also nourished by our sense impressions: images, sounds, smells and ambiance, which we internalise daily, consciously or unconsciously."
Thomas Van Elsen, FiBL
Jessica Wohlander, of Food & Water Watch, a nonprofit consumer organization, will be visiting with CSA members next Saturday in Brooklyn. Food and Water Watch are working on an ongoing campaign, calling on Governor Cuomo to ban fracking, and will be at the Brooklyn distribution talk to you about the negative impacts fracking has on our water, air, climate, and environment, which all effect our local food systems

Food, Not Fracking
 
By Jessica Wohlander
 
New York’s food, farms, and agriculture are under threat from fracking, a dangerous gas-drilling method that threatens the purity of our water, air, and land.
 
In New York, we’re fortunate to have access to fresh, vegetables grown on local farms, yet there are communities around the country who do not have access to such fresh produce. In states where hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is underway, farmers’ livelihoods and the food system they support are threatened. We must send a strong message to Governor Cuomo, demanding that he stop this dangerous practice from undermining our own food systems by banning fracking in our state.
 
Fracking is the process of injecting a mixture of water, sand and chemicals into wells at high pressure to crack dense rock formations and release oil or gas. Up to 75 percent of the millions of gallons of water that is required per well ends up back on the surface as waste water, contaminated with toxic chemicals as well as other naturally occurring pollutants and radioactive material. This fluid can leak into the water supplies of residents and farmers, which happens as a result of frequent accidents and normal operations. The consequences are dire. These toxins contaminate the soil, poison livestock, and pollute the air, while methane emissions contribute to climate change. All of this results in decreased productivity of farmers’ fields and livestock while lowering their property value and threatening the safety of locally grown food.
 
Governor Cuomo is considering allowing fracking in regions where farming is central to the local economy. In the Southern Tier, for example, dairy products make up two-thirds of agricultural sales. In Pennsylvania, counties with dairy farms that had at least 150 fracking wells experienced a 16% decline in their dairy productivity, compared to regions without fracking wells, which experienced a 3% increase in productivity.
 
Because of the clear dangers of fracking, the movement to ban it is gaining momentum. Hundreds of farmers, brewers, vintners and chefs, including Mario Batali of The Food Network, and over 1,000 businesses and 242 organizations have joined the coalition New Yorkers Against Fracking. Despite this, Governor Cuomo has not yet made up his mind, so it is imperative that we keep fighting.
 
There are numerous ways to get involved. Food & Water Watch and New Yorkers Against Fracking are planning rallies throughout the summer, and the more people at those rallies the more likely Governor Cuomo is to pay attention. Anyone can write a letter to the editor of local, state and national newspapers to speak out against the dangerous practice and encourage others to do the same. In addition, we are constantly collecting and delivering petitions to Governor Cuomo, a powerful tactic in which everyone can participate. If you are interested in participating in any of these actions, we would love to hear from you! Feel free to reach out using the contact info below.
 
Fracking is exceptionally damaging to our water, air, and soil. If these are contaminated, the food we eat will be as well. If we are going to continue to enjoy fresh, local vegetables, we must urge Governor Cuomo to ban fracking now!
 
Jessica Wohlander, MA is an activist with Food & Water Watch, a nonprofit consumer organization with offices in Brooklyn (www.FoodandWaterWatch.org).  To get involved, contact Jessica at jwohlander@fwwlocal.org.
 
 

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Copyright © 2014 Lineage Farm CSA, All rights reserved.
Thanks for joining our CSA for the 2014 season!

Our mailing address is:

Lineage Farm CSA
520 Clinton St.

Hudson, Ny 12534

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Special Release – Maple Syrup now available for Lineage Farm CSA members!


Twinkle Twinkle little star…
 
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Lineage Farm CSA

Special Release -

Now taking Maple Syrup Orders!

Dear Friends, Neighbors, and CSA Members,

Circle C Maple Syrup Farmers are again offering Lineage Farm CSA Members a share of their Syrup Bounty.  See below for their descriptions and prices.  Place your orders with us, checks made out to Lineage Farm, and we will deliver your Maple Syrup in early August.

We are also speaking with Flower Farmer Angela DeFelice of Sol Flower Farm, with the potential of a flower bouquet share add-on for the rest of the season!  Stay tuned for more of this lovely news.
 

Your farmers,
Jen, Jon, and Garlicky Sam

 

We are teaming up with Circle C Maple Farm to offer you Maple Syrup Shares.

The Circle C Syrup Farmers are again offering various sizes, from 12 oz bottles to Gallon size bottles, of both Grade A and Grade B Maple Syrup, straight from their Hudson Valley Maple farm to you!  Visit Circle C's Maple Syrup Page to read more about their farm and their syrup!

Order by July 30th, by emailing Jen Ronsani of Lineage Farm at lineagefarm@riseup.net, and send a check made out to Lineage Farm, with size and grade desired written in the memo section.  Mail to:

Lineage Farm
520 Clinton St.
Hudson NY 12534
 

Syrup will be delivered to your regular vegetable pick up site in early August.

Share
Tweet
Forward
+1
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Read Later
Facebook
Facebook
Website
Website
Copyright © 2014 Lineage Farm CSA, All rights reserved.
Thanks for joining our CSA for the 2014 season!

Our mailing address is:

Lineage Farm CSA
520 Clinton St.

Hudson, Ny 12534