Lineage Farm CSA Newsletter #13


Ch-ch-ch-ch-changes
Diaper Change Again
Ch-ch-changes
Smells like we're gonna have to do another diaper change…
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Lineage Farm CSA

August 28th

week thirteen!!!
(4 pm start in Poughkeepsie this week)

Brooklyn:
Saturday June 7th
10:30-12:30
at the
Greenpoint Reformed Church
136 Milton Street, Greenpoint NY

White Plains:
Saturdays
10-12pm
at the
White Plains Presbyterian Church
39 N. Broadway

Scarsdale:
Tuesdays 6/17, 7/1, 7/15, 7/29, 8/12, and 8/26
4:30-7pm
at the
Hitchcock Presbyterian Church,
6 Greenacres Avenue,
Scarsdale, NY 10583

Poughkeepsie:
Tuesdays
 4-6:30pm
at the
Jewish Community Center
Grand Avenue
Poughkeepsie, NY

Hudson:
Wednesdays
4:30 to 5:30pm
at
Sam Sutty's and Son
713 Warren St
Hudson, NY 12534

This Week's Harvest:
Tomatoes, Summer Squash, Eggplants, Peppers of various sorts, Carrots, Beets, Salad Radishes, Beans, Herbs, and more!

Dear CSA Members, Neighbors, Friends, Family,
Change is in the air.  In the past couple weeks, I've been spotting those initial tiny bursts of flaming color appearing in this tree, on that branch.  It never ceases to surprise me to see burning orange Maple leaves in mid August.  And now, with August very nearly over, the patches of color are slowly spreading to include a few yellows and crimsons.  Not to worry, though – there is still plenty of summertime green, and the height of fall color generally holds off until mid-October.  The nights have been a steady low 60s of late, with daily highs holding in the sunny low 80s. 

 

One lovely late summer phenomenon greeted us in the early mornings last week, as we drove to the farm through such dense fog one could not see a full 20 feet ahead.  Warm soil and cool air, perhaps?  I would share a photo, but it just looks white!
 

The Delicata and Sweet Dumpling Squash are safely cured and tucked away, awaiting your culinary delight in the coming weeks.  The Acorn Squash have been cut from their dying vines, and await our gathering them from the fields.  Delicatas are generally ready to eat first, while Acorns require a few weeks curing before their sweetness arises, and Butternuts take longest of all that we grow.  The Butternuts are just now ready to be cut from their vines, then to keep and feed us all well through the winter (depending on how long you hold off from eating yours!).  There are varieties, though we do not grow them, that only mature in flavor after months of storage.  I always get a craving to grow a wide and wild variety of winter squashes; their flavor profile descriptions just reel me in the way tomatoes get most people.  We did a trial patch of White Cushaw this year, a couple dozen plants, and you might run in to a few of these large white-ish squash come November – purported to have an aroma of pumpkin and cantaloupe, with superb sweet orange flesh, I'm really looking forward to cutting one open.
 

Sam was happily crawling along the sandy pathways this week, as I pulled and topped a bed of beets to save them from foraging deer.  Apparently he does not appreciate summer squash harvest, though, as that turned into a grumpy endeavor.  Probably just my timing, really – pushing to finish a task when he was ready for another nap.  He is also working on another top tooth – his fifth already! and it seems like he just started cutting teeth a few weeks ago.  Which I guess, he did. 
 

full harvest!

The summer is absolutely flying by for me, this year.  After this week, only 10 distributions remain!  I am working up a mid-season survey for y'all to tell me about your experiences with us as your farmers.  Please be candid, and wordy, as that is the a great way we figure out how to improve!

Your farmers,
Jen, Jon, and Baby Sam

 

Debbie's Borscht Recipe (see below for another recipe, too)
4 large beets, washed, peeled and chopped in large chunks
1 med. Onion, peeled and chopped
5 cups cold water
1 tsp. salt
1 1/2 Tbl. Sugar
Juice of 1/2 lemon
Optional garnish:  sour cream, yoghurt, chopped chives
 
Put beets, onion, water in 3 quart pot.  
Bring to boil, simmering for about 15-20 min, skimming as foam rises.
Add salt, sugar, lemon juice and remove from heat and puree.
 
Can be served cold or hot (with diced cooked potatoes instead of sour cream or yoghurt).

And bonus -
Debbie's Tomato Leek Soup Recipe
(she says this one is excellent frozen for winter eating)
 

2 Tbl. olive oil
2 leeks, mostly white parts, chopped (about 1 cup)
1 large clove garlic. crushed
2 lbs. fresh tomatoes, coarsely chopped, about 4 cups
6 oz. can tomato paste
5 3/8 cups broth
1 Tbl. chopped fresh basil
1 bay leaf
Salt and pepper to taste
 
Heat oil in 4 qt. saucepan.  Add leeks and garlic.  Cook 5 min., stirring frequently
Add tomatoes and paste.  Cook 5 minutes, stirring often.
Add broth and seasonings and bring to a boil.
Reduce heat and simmer uncovered 20 min.
Remove from heat and remove bay leaf.
Puree.  (I use a food mill to take out the tomato skins.)
May be served cold or hot.
 
Makes 8-10 servings.

 

 

Parable

First divesting ourselves of worldly goods, as St. Francis teaches,
in order that our souls not be distracted
by gain and loss, and in order also
that our bodies be free to move
easily at the mountain passes, we had then to discuss
whither or where we might travel, with the second question being
should we have a purpose, against which
many of us argued fiercely that such purpose
corresponded to worldly goods, meaning a limitation or constriction,
whereas others said it was by this word we were consecrated
pilgrims rather than wanderers: in our minds, the word translated as
a dream, a something-sought, so that by concentrating we might see it
glimmering among the stones, and not
pass blindly by; each
further issue we debated equally fully, the arguments going back and forth,
so that we grew, some said, less flexible and more resigned,
like soldiers in a useless war. And snow fell upon us, and wind blew,
which in time abated — where the snow had been, many flowers appeared,
and where the stars had shone, the sun rose over the tree line
so that we had shadows again; many times this happened.
Also rain, also flooding sometimes, also avalanches, in which
some of us were lost, and periodically we would seem
to have achieved an agreement; our canteens
hoisted upon our shoulders, but always that moment passed, so
(after many years) we were still at that first stage, still
preparing to begin a journey, but we were changed nevertheless;
we could see this in one another; we had changed although
we never moved, and one said, ah, behold how we have aged, traveling
from day to night only, neither forward nor sideward, and this seemed
in a strange way miraculous. And those who believed we should have a purpose
believed this was the purpose, and those who felt we must remain free
in order to encounter truth, felt it had been revealed.

— LOUISE GLÜCK, winner of the Pulitzer Prize and author, most recently, of “A Village Life”

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Copyright © 2014 Lineage Farm CSA, All rights reserved.
Thanks for joining our CSA for the 2014 season!

Our mailing address is:

Lineage Farm CSA
520 Clinton St.

Hudson, Ny 12534

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Lineage Farm CSA Newsletter #12


Now it's time to say Good Night
Good Night, Sleep Tight.
Now, the Sun turns out his Light
Good Night, Sleeep Tight…
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Lineage Farm CSA

August 22nd

week twelve!!!
(early 3 pm start in Poughkeepsie this week)

Brooklyn:
Saturday June 7th
10:30-12:30
at the
Greenpoint Reformed Church
136 Milton Street, Greenpoint NY

White Plains:
Saturdays
10-12pm
at the
White Plains Presbyterian Church
39 N. Broadway

Scarsdale:
Tuesdays 6/17, 7/1, 7/15, 7/29, 8/12, and 8/26
4:30-7pm
at the
Hitchcock Presbyterian Church,
6 Greenacres Avenue,
Scarsdale, NY 10583

Poughkeepsie:
Tuesdays
 4-6:30pm
at the
Jewish Community Center
Grand Avenue
Poughkeepsie, NY

Hudson:
Wednesdays
4:30 to 5:30pm
at
Sam Sutty's and Son
713 Warren St
Hudson, NY 12534

This Week's Harvest:
Leeks!, Tomatoes!, Hooligan Squash! Eggplants, Peppers of various sorts, Carrots, Beets, Summer Squash, Cucumbers, Herbs, and more!

Dear Friends, Neighbors, CSA Members

Done!  The very last transplants of the season are in the ground, and the greenhouse is officially transformed from the place plants start out their lives to the curing zone.  Garlic is already cured, with dry skin protecting the cloves.  Onions – Rossa Lunga (elongated red), Dakota Tears (yellow), and Cabernet (red) now deck the tables, necks drying down and skins curing.  Next up, all those tasty Delicatas, Acorns, and other small "Autumn" Squashes, piling in from the fields, and the season of squash will be rounded off with the larger Butternuts and Cushaws.

Sam had a long and fruitful week – and I'm not only referring to his enjoyment of pears and melons.  He just cut his two top front teeth, and he's crawling!  Amazing how in just a few days so much changes.  He is thrilled to have increased his mobility, though he's not going too far, too fast quite yet.  He also enjoyed helping us weed the rutabagas, fall cabbages, and collard greens.

The refreshing fall array of brassicas are now pushing up under the row cover – rows of arugula, hakurei turnips, and radishes will soon be harvestable.  In case I forget to include it in a future newsletter, look up arugula salad with roasted winter squash, it was a big hit with Jon's family last year. 

The gradual process of garden clean up has begun – Jon has mowed down several aging beds, clearing space for the over wintering cover crops.  We've spread rye and clover seed on a good portion of the garden, and will soon be spreading field peas and oats as well.  The grains, seeded heavily, will provide a goodly amount of biomass, and the legumes will fix nitrogen, and together they will smother weeds, adding up to more fertility and lower weed pressure in the future.

Who else is pumped about these celeriac?

Next week the assessor will check out that property we are interested in acquiring.   After that, we figure out what we will offer.  Keep your fingers crossed for us!

Dreaming sweet dreams,
Your farmers,
Jen, Jon, and Baby Sam

Leek and Swiss Chard Tart
ingredients

  • 1 sheet frozen puff pastry (half of 17.3-ounce package), thawed
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 3 large leeks (white and pale green parts only), coarsely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/2 bunch Swiss chard, ribs removed, leaves chopped (about 2 1/2 cups)
  • 1 1/4 cups whipping cream
  • 3 large eggs
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • Pinch of ground nutmeg

preparation

Roll out pastry on floured work surface to 12-inch square. Transfer to 9-inch-diameter glass pie dish. Trim overhang to 1 inch. Fold under; crimp edges. Cover; chill.

Melt butter in large skillet over medium-low heat. Add leeks and thyme. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Cover; cook until leeks are very tender but not brown, stirring often, about 10 minutes. Add chard; saute until wilted, about 2 minutes. Remove from heat; cool.

Position rack in bottom third of oven; preheat to 425°F. Whisk cream and next 5 ingredients in large bowl. Mix in cooled leek mixture. Pour filling into crust.

Bake tart 15 minutes. Reduce heat to 350°F and bake until filling is puffed and just set in center, about 15 minutes longer. Transfer to rack; cool 10 minutes.

SONNET 18

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimm'd;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st;
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

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Copyright © 2014 Lineage Farm CSA, All rights reserved.
Thanks for joining our CSA for the 2014 season!

Our mailing address is:

Lineage Farm CSA
520 Clinton St.

Hudson, Ny 12534


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Lineage Farm CSA Newsletter #11


Morning has come
Night is away
Rise with the Sun
and Welcome the Day!
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Lineage Farm CSA

August 16th

week eleven
(4 pm start in Poughkeepsie this week)

Brooklyn:
Saturday June 7th
10:30-12:30
at the

Greenpoint Reformed Church
136 Milton Street, Greenpoint NY

White Plains:
Saturdays
10-12pm
at the
White Plains Presbyterian Church
39 N. Broadway

Scarsdale:
Tuesdays 6/17, 7/1, 7/15, 7/29, 8/12, and 8/26
4:30-7pm
at the
Hitchcock Presbyterian Church,
6 Greenacres Avenue,

Scarsdale, NY 10583

Poughkeepsie:
Tuesdays
 4-6:30pm
at the
Jewish Community Center
Grand Avenue
Poughkeepsie, NY

Hudson:
Wednesdays
4:30 to 5:30pm
at
Sam Sutty's and Son
713 Warren St

Hudson, NY 12534

This Week's Harvest:
Leeks!, Tomatoes!, Eggplants, Peppers, Lettuce Heads, Carrots, Beets, Summer Squash, Cucumbers, Dill, and more!

 

Maple Syrup Orders have arrived.
Dear Friends, Neighbors, CSA Members

Summer nights are coming in chilly this year.  Sam's been wearing long sleeves and pants all week, and today I even closed our bedroom window for the chill.  Is it climate change, is it just an odd year, or even maybe it's both?  Seems like every year has been a bit "odd" since I started farming, and paying more attention than back when I was in a climate controlled office job.  So what is "normal" weather these days, anyone?

Late Tuesday evening, on the way back from Scarsdale, somebody side-swiped our van.  Luckily, no one was hurt, but our feelings (and pocketbooks) sure were when the guy drove off without exchanging any ID or insurance information.  That's twice in two years this van has been the victim of a hit and run!

On the up-side, if not also the odd-side, we just ate the first of our vine ripened winter squashes.  I've decided the better name for these earlier, smaller varieties would be autumn squash, especially with how autumnal the weather has been feeling these past days.  Just as the summer squashes are winding down and out, the delicatas and other smaller squashes come to bear.  I believe the varietal name of the one we ate is "hooligan," though it seemed no trickster or delinquent to me.  Quite tasty, actually.  We'll be harvesting those next week, and starting to send them your way soon after.  Still keeping the potatoes on the back burners, waiting for the tops to die back before we start digging.  Those tubers'll keep growing so long as there's green above ground, so hopefully that means we'll be unearthing some big beauties this year.

 You may have noticed, in the photos from last week, that we bought a new tractor.  No longer does it take two days, sore knees and a roughed up back to ready a couple acres.  The other day, it only took Jon two hours!  It drives like a dream, and has enough power not only to handle the tasks we need it to now, but should be able to handle the tasks we will be growing into in the years to come!

We have more transitioning news – and it's a big one.  We've been given one more year on the land we currently lease.  Jon's cousins are simply itching to be farming there themselves, again (they make hay).  We've got our eye on a lovely property right outside of Hudson, replete with barns (room for an indoor wash station/packing shed, electricity and plumbing!!!), a carriage house in poor/fairish condition, and machine shed, a pond, and some lovely vegetable soil.  We're busy working out how to pay for it – applying for a mortgage, a bridging grant, and to sell the development rights for a conservation easement.  Keep your fingers crossed for us, this could be a dream come true.

Wishing upon a star,
Your farmers,
Jen, Jon, and Baby Sam

“You did everything possible to bury me
But you forgot that I am a seed”

Dinos Christianopoulos, greek poet
 

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Copyright © 2014 Lineage Farm CSA, All rights reserved.
Thanks for joining our CSA for the 2014 season!

Our mailing address is:

Lineage Farm CSA
520 Clinton St.

Hudson, Ny 12534

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Lineage Farm CSA Newsletter #10

Open, shut them, open, shut them

Give a little clap

Open, shut them, open, shut them

Lay them in your lap.

Lineage Farm CSA

August 9th

week ten
(early 3 pm start in Poughkeepsie this week)

Brooklyn:
Saturday June 7th
10:30-12:30
at the

Greenpoint Reformed Church
136 Milton Street, Greenpoint NY

White Plains:
Saturdays
10-12pm
at the
White Plains Presbyterian Church
39 N. Broadway

Scarsdale:
Tuesdays 6/17, 7/1, 7/15, 7/29, 8/12, and 8/26
4:30-7pm
at the
Hitchcock Presbyterian Church,
6 Greenacres Avenue,

Scarsdale, NY 10583

Poughkeepsie:
Tuesdays
4-6:30pm
at the
Jewish Community Center
Grand Avenue
Poughkeepsie, NY

Hudson:
Wednesdays
4:30 to 5:30pm
at
Sam Sutty’s and Son
713 Warren St

Hudson, NY 12534

This Week’s Harvest:
Solanacea, Cucurbita Pepo, Lactuca, Beta Vulgaris, Daucus Carota, Cucumis Sativus, Allium Sativum, Brassica rapa Komatsuna, Abelmoschus esculentus, Lycopersicon esculentum, and basil.

Dear Friends, Neighbors, CSA Members

In the name of sleep deprivation, I am taking this opportunity to share the week in photo form, instead of formulating paragraphs.  Enjoy!

Worth a thousand words,
From,

Your farmers,
Jen, Jon, and Baby Sam

Okra flowers are always so pretty.
And the oregano in flower is pretty, as well, with tiny blossoms ranging from pale lavender to deep purple.  Only a few herb plants flowered, the rest we’ve been able to harvest often enough to keep it from bolting.
Each site has its own character(s)…Poughkeepsie’s first August pickup (looking for vanilla ice cream)
Brooklyn’s late July distribution, piled high!
This Tomato Hornworm is a handsome devil, set to eat up all the tomato leaves in a steady and not so slow pace.
Lucky for us, the parasitic braconid wasps are on the prowl: this Tomato Hornworm is not quite so handsome, with thousands of wasp eggs sprouting out of its back.  Once the eggs hatch, bye bye hornworm!
What better time to nap than right now?
And after the nap, all smiles.
Hey, check out those teeth!
Storm’s a brewing – it’s been a wet season.  Our soil has handled it well, with only minor flooding.
Menacing clouds don’t stop us from piling up the pulled weeds – at least, not until the lightning and thunder show up to high-tail us outta there.  Neighborly farmer Aliyah of Ironwood Farm gives us a hand cleaning out the fall Kale and Broccoli beds.
Photo by Fumie Ishii.  The happy couple…
Photo by Fumie Ishii.  On our brand new Kubota Tractor!  It drives like a charm, so smooth we didn’t know what we were missing, getting jolted around with our old Ford.  Ahh, the joys of actually being able to chisel plow or disc without jarring your knees and teeth out.
Photo by Fumie Ishii.  Carmine, Jon’s father, wins the eggplant face look-a-like contest.  Wish I had a profile portrait of these two – this eggplant really does have a nose!
Ratatouille

Ingredients

1/4 cup olive oil, plus more as needed
1 1/2 cups small diced yellow onion
1 teaspoon minced garlic
2 cups medium diced eggplant, skin on
1/2 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves
1 cup diced green bell peppers
1 cup diced red bell peppers
1 cup diced zucchini squash
1 cup diced yellow squash
1 1/2 cups peeled, seeded and chopped tomatoes
1 tablespoon thinly sliced fresh basil leaves
1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley leaves
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions

Set a large 12-inch saute pan over medium heat and add the olive oil. Once hot, add the onions and garlic to the pan. Cook the onions, stirring occasionally, until they are wilted and lightly caramelized, about 5 to 7 minutes. Add the eggplant and thyme to the pan and continue to cook, stirring occasionally, until the eggplant is partially cooked, about 5 minutes. Add the green and red peppers, zucchini, and squash and continue to cook for an additional 5 minutes. Add the tomatoes, basil, parsley, and salt and pepper, to taste, and cook for a final 5 minutes. Stir well to blend and serve either hot or at room temperature.

Read more at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ratatouille-recipe0.html?oc=linkback

“In order for agriculture to be sustainable, the soil must be attentively cared for.  Not only does the soil need to be respected and conserved, it must be enlivened, regenerated and developed.  This is an ongoing endeavour.  Through the miracle of photosynthesis, the activity of the sun, and the formative forces of the universe, plants create living substances from the mineral kingdom.  Drawing carbon dioxide and nitrogen from the atmosphere as well as from water, the plant enlivens the soil by its root secretions (rhizospheres), and in living soil this activity produces an increase in humic levels (microbial humus)….We must never forget that the fundamental aim of biodynamic agriculture is the production of quality nutrition, whilst respecting nature’s kingdoms and the creatures that live in it.  The earth, nutrition and human beings are therefore completely intertwined.”
A Biodynamic Manual, 2nd Edition, Pierre Masson
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Copyright © 2014 Lineage Farm CSA, All rights reserved.
Thanks for joining our CSA for the 2014 season!Our mailing address is:

Lineage Farm CSA

520 Clinton St.

Hudson, Ny 12534

 

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Lineage Farm CSA Newsletter #9


How I wonder what you are…
 
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Lineage Farm CSA

August 1st!

week nine
(4 pm start in Poughkeepsie this week)

Brooklyn:
Saturday June 7th
10:30-12:30
at the

Greenpoint Reformed Church
136 Milton Street, Greenpoint NY

White Plains:
Saturdays
10-12pm
at the
White Plains Presbyterian Church
39 N. Broadway

Scarsdale:
Tuesdays 6/17, 7/1, 7/15, 7/29, 8/12, and 8/26
4:30-7pm
at the
Hitchcock Presbyterian Church,
6 Greenacres Avenue,

Scarsdale, NY 10583

Poughkeepsie:
Tuesdays
 4-6:30pm
at the
Jewish Community Center
Grand Avenue
Poughkeepsie, NY

Hudson:
Wednesdays
4:30 to 5:30pm
at
Sam Sutty's and Son
713 Warren St

Hudson, NY 12534

 

The time to order Maple Syrup is NOW!

This week's share (subject to change) – 
Komatsuna (mild Asian green delicious as a salad or cooked like spinach), Bell Peppers, Carrots, Summer Squash, Zucchini, Patty Pan Squash, Eggplant, Cucumbers galore, various Herbs like Cilantro and Oregano and Basil and more!


Shishito Peppers
I've never had a hot one, though
legend has it, 1 out of 13 is hot…
Great for tempura, grilled or charred and roasted whole, chopped and sauteed…

Dear Friends, Neighbors, and CSA Members,

Fare thee well, July, the summer month that just flew by.  And so, with a bit more rain, ends the coolest, rainiest July in four years.  The first rainy July of Lineage Farm's lifetime!  And Sam's too, for that matter (though I don't know if it counts since it's his first July, period).  I keep wondering if the cool nights, ranging down into the upper 50s, will badly impact our fruit crop (peppers, tomatoes, eggplants), but so far so good.  The fruit set seems to be hearty, healthy, and hale.

Jon finished seeding the fall brassicas this week.  Always a step ahead – seed today so that we may reap tomorrow (or in a couple months time, as is generally the case).  From Thursday's seeding, you will soon enough be filling your bags with daikon and winter radishes, those big ones that make a whole salad from one radish, as well as those delectable cool season greens – both spicy and mild – that enjoy the end of summer's heat.  We also transplanted the storage beets, some Red Shiso, more basil and more lettuce, nearly wrapping up the bulk of our transplanting season.  A few more beets, lettuces, and cilantros to go…

Ok, I admit it – we ate the first tomatoes.  Nothing like a sun-ripened tomato eaten out in the sun.  But not to worry!  Looks like we'll be loading you down (if you so desire) with quite a few of those red and orange globes this coming week.  We're also looking forward to harvesting potatoes and onions this month.

Don't forget to order your Maple Syrup RIGHT NOW – you should have received an email with details earlier last week.  Let us know what you want – lineagefarm@riseup.net, and we'll order it for you.  Make checks payable  to Lineage Farm,
 

From amidst the ripening fruit,
Your farmers,
Jen, Jon, and Baby Sam

Komatsuna and Maitake Stir Fry

Ingredients(2 servings)

Maitake mushrooms
80-100 g
Komatsuna
100 g
Garlic
1 clove
Olive oil
1 tablespoon
Sake
2 teaspoons
Soy sauce
1 teaspoon
Salt
a small amount
Pepper
a small amount

1
Shred the maitake into bite-sized pieces. Thoroughly rinse the komatsuna, then chop into 5-cm lengths.

2
Pour the olive oil into a frying pan, and add the thinly sliced garlic and heat until aromatic (over medium heat).

3
Increase heat to high, add the maitake and komatsuna, then add the sake right away. When the vegetables become tender, season with soy sauce, salt, and pepper, then serve!!

Jessica Wohlander, of Food & Water Watch, a nonprofit consumer organization, will be visiting with CSA members this Saturday in Brooklyn. Food and Water Watch are working on an ongoing campaign, calling on Governor Cuomo to ban fracking, and will be at the Brooklyn distribution talk to you about the negative impacts fracking has on our water, air, climate, and environment, which all effect our local food systems

Food, Not Fracking
 
By Jessica Wohlander
 
New York’s food, farms, and agriculture are under threat from fracking, a dangerous gas-drilling method that threatens the purity of our water, air, and land.
 
In New York, we’re fortunate to have access to fresh, vegetables grown on local farms, yet there are communities around the country who do not have access to such fresh produce. In states where hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is underway, farmers’ livelihoods and the food system they support are threatened. We must send a strong message to Governor Cuomo, demanding that he stop this dangerous practice from undermining our own food systems by banning fracking in our state.
 
Fracking is the process of injecting a mixture of water, sand and chemicals into wells at high pressure to crack dense rock formations and release oil or gas. Up to 75 percent of the millions of gallons of water that is required per well ends up back on the surface as waste water, contaminated with toxic chemicals as well as other naturally occurring pollutants and radioactive material. This fluid can leak into the water supplies of residents and farmers, which happens as a result of frequent accidents and normal operations. The consequences are dire. These toxins contaminate the soil, poison livestock, and pollute the air, while methane emissions contribute to climate change. All of this results in decreased productivity of farmers’ fields and livestock while lowering their property value and threatening the safety of locally grown food.
 
Governor Cuomo is considering allowing fracking in regions where farming is central to the local economy. In the Southern Tier, for example, dairy products make up two-thirds of agricultural sales. In Pennsylvania, counties with dairy farms that had at least 150 fracking wells experienced a 16% decline in their dairy productivity, compared to regions without fracking wells, which experienced a 3% increase in productivity.
 
Because of the clear dangers of fracking, the movement to ban it is gaining momentum. Hundreds of farmers, brewers, vintners and chefs, including Mario Batali of The Food Network, and over 1,000 businesses and 242 organizations have joined the coalition New Yorkers Against Fracking. Despite this, Governor Cuomo has not yet made up his mind, so it is imperative that we keep fighting.
 
There are numerous ways to get involved. Food & Water Watch and New Yorkers Against Fracking are planning rallies throughout the summer, and the more people at those rallies the more likely Governor Cuomo is to pay attention. Anyone can write a letter to the editor of local, state and national newspapers to speak out against the dangerous practice and encourage others to do the same. In addition, we are constantly collecting and delivering petitions to Governor Cuomo, a powerful tactic in which everyone can participate. If you are interested in participating in any of these actions, we would love to hear from you! Feel free to reach out using the contact info below.
 
Fracking is exceptionally damaging to our water, air, and soil. If these are contaminated, the food we eat will be as well. If we are going to continue to enjoy fresh, local vegetables, we must urge Governor Cuomo to ban fracking now!
 
Jessica Wohlander, MA is an activist with Food & Water Watch, a nonprofit consumer organization with offices in Brooklyn (www.FoodandWaterWatch.org).  To get involved, contact Jessica at jwohlander@fwwlocal.org.
 
 

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520 Clinton St.

Hudson, Ny 12534


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Lipneage Farm CSA Newsletter #8


Twinkle Twinkle little star…
 
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Lineage Farm CSA

July 26th

week eight
(EARLY 3 pm start in Poughkeepsie this week)

Brooklyn:
Saturday June 7th
10:30-12:30
at the
Greenpoint Reformed Church
136 Milton Street, Greenpoint NY

White Plains:
Saturdays
10-12pm
at the
White Plains Presbyterian Church
39 N. Broadway

Scarsdale:
Tuesdays 6/17, 7/1, 7/15, 7/29, 8/12, and 8/26
4:30-7pm
at the
Hitchcock Presbyterian Church,
6 Greenacres Avenue,
Scarsdale, NY 10583

Poughkeepsie:
Tuesdays
 4-6:30pm
at the
Jewish Community Center
Grand Avenue
Poughkeepsie, NY

Hudson:
Wednesdays
4:30 to 5:30pm
at
Sam Sutty's and Son
713 Warren St
Hudson, NY 12534

 

This week's share (subject to change) – 
Yukina Savoy (like a summery, savoyed tat soi), Komatsuna (Asian green delicious as a salad or cooked like spinach), Carrots, Summer Squash, Zucchini, Patty Pan Squash, Eggplant, Cucumbers galore, various Herbs, and more!

Dear Friends, Neighbors, and CSA Members,

A busy week, to say the least.  We pulled all the garlic on Monday; it's set to cure in our shaded greenhouse for the next couple weeks.  We cultivated and hand weeded our fall storage carrots (that time already!), which are currently less than an inch tall.  We cleaned out some of the spring greens beds, getting ready for end of the season radish, spinach, and beet plantings.  Elizabeth from OGRIN visited Tuesday afternoon with her walk behind reaper-binder to help Jon harvest the four varieties of wheat seed we grew for them.  Jon borrowed Miller's Crossing's Farm's combine to harvest the acre of heirloom rye and Banatka wheat we grew behind our greenhouse.  And we enjoyed a lovely thunderstorm, which brought a delightfully pleasant, cool Thursday after one seriously sweaty Wednesday.

Sam is trying his mightiest to start crawling.  He'll pull himself forward from a seated position, rocking back and forth until he can shoot his legs backwards and end up on his hands and knees.  More often than not, he'll keep sending his legs backwards so that he's just hold himself up on his hands and belly, and starts scooting himself backwards, at which point he'll start calling us for reinforcements, as this was clearly not what he pictured happening!

Summer's bounty is revealing itself to us, as the tomatoes and peppers continue to ripen, and eggplant has made it into our meals almost once a day this entire week – grilled, sauteed, in eggplant parm and ratatouille and even a curry.  Thus the beauty of Farmers' Prerogative – while we generally glean our weekly vegetables from what's left at the end of the Brooklyn (Saturday) and Hudson (Wednesday) pick-ups, we've definitely taken some pretty serious dibs on the eggplant this week!  Of course, every single one of those dishes got some Summer Squash or Zucchini in there too.  We're definitely swimming in the fruits!

Don't forget to order your Maple Syrup by the end of July – you should have received an email with details earlier this week.  If not, or if you've got any questions, let us know – lineagefarm@riseup.net

From the waves of amber grains
Your farmers,
Jen, Jon, and Baby Sam

Eggplant Parm

Here’s a version with the vegetables and meat grilled or broiled instead of breaded and fried. You can skip the chicken if you like, and add other vegetables, like zucchini and portobello mushrooms; just grill them and layer on top of the eggplant and before the cheese.

For a simple vegetable gratin, omit the tomato sauce and layer any cooked vegetable you like (asparagus, broccoli, cauliflower, artichoke hearts, potatoes, fennel, leeks, spinach, onions, celery root, parsnips, Jerusalem artichokes, winter squash, or sweet potatoes) with the cheese (Gruyère and Swiss are nice alternatives). Finish with the seasoned bread crumb topping for a most excellent crust.

Yield: 4 to 6 servings Time: About 1 hour

2 or 3 eggplants (about 2 pounds total), unpeeled, and cut crosswise into 1/2-inch slices
Salt
1 tablespoon olive oil, plus more for brushing
Freshly ground black pepper
About 1/2 pound boneless, skinless white meat chicken (breast, cutlets, or tenders), pounded to uniform thickness if necessary and blotted dry
4 cups All-Purpose Tomato Sauce (see below)
1 cup grated Parmesan cheese, plus more if you like
About 30 fresh basil leaves
2 ounces grated or torn mozzarella cheese (optional)
1 cup bread crumbs
  1. If the eggplant is particularly large or full of seeds, sprinkle it with salt and set in a colander for at least 15 and up to 60 minutes. Rinse and pat dry. Heat the oven to 400°F. Heat a charcoal or gas grill, or the broiler, and move the rack to about 4 inches from the heat source. (You can also use a stovetop grill pan here, heated over medium-high heat.)
  2. Brush the eggplant lightly on both sides with some oil and sprinkle with salt (if you didn’t salt it earlier) and pepper. Grill or broil until browned on both sides, turning once or twice and brushing with more oil if the eggplant looks dry. The idea is to keep the eggplant cooking steadily without burning, so adjust the heat and position as needed. The eggplant is usually ready in somewhere between 5 and 10 minutes. When done, set eggplant slices aside.
  3. Cut the chicken so you have 8 or so large pieces. Pound or press them a bit so they’re evenly flat. Brush them all over with some oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Grill or broil the chicken, turning once, no more than 3 minutes per side (to check for doneness, cut into a piece with a thin-bladed knife; the center should still be slightly pink). Set the chicken aside.
  4. Lightly oil a 2-quart baking dish, then spoon a layer of the tomato sauce into the bottom. Top with a layer of eggplant, then a sprinkling of Parmesan, then a layer of chicken, and finally a few basil leaves. Repeat until all the ingredients are used. (There will probably be sauce left over; warm it up to pass at the table.) Toss the remaining Parmesan with the bread crumbs, and the mozzarella if you’re using it. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon of olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, then toss again. Spread the bread crumb mixture evenly on top of the mozzarella. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes, or until the dish is bubbling hot. Serve hot or warm.

All-Purpose Tomato Sauce

Makes: 6 to 8 servings (about 1 quart)
Time: 30 minutes

1/4 cup olive oil
1 large onion or 2 medium onions, chopped
About 4 pounds canned whole tomatoes (two 28- or 35-ounce cans), chopped, liquid reserved
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley or basil leaves (optional)

  1. Put the olive oil in a pot over medium heat. When the oil is hot, add the onions, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and cook, stirring occasionally, until soft, about 3 minutes. Then add the tomatoes.
  2. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the tomatoes break down and the mixture comes together and thickens a bit, 10 to 15 minutes. For a thinner sauce, add some or all of the reserved liquid and cook for another 5 to 10 minutes; if you want a thick sauce, save it for another use. Taste, adjust the seasonings, and stir in the herbs before using. (You can also let the sauce cool, cover, and refrigerate for up to several days.)
"We don't live by bread alone.  We are also nourished by our sense impressions: images, sounds, smells and ambiance, which we internalise daily, consciously or unconsciously."
Thomas Van Elsen, FiBL
Jessica Wohlander, of Food & Water Watch, a nonprofit consumer organization, will be visiting with CSA members next Saturday in Brooklyn. Food and Water Watch are working on an ongoing campaign, calling on Governor Cuomo to ban fracking, and will be at the Brooklyn distribution talk to you about the negative impacts fracking has on our water, air, climate, and environment, which all effect our local food systems

Food, Not Fracking
 
By Jessica Wohlander
 
New York’s food, farms, and agriculture are under threat from fracking, a dangerous gas-drilling method that threatens the purity of our water, air, and land.
 
In New York, we’re fortunate to have access to fresh, vegetables grown on local farms, yet there are communities around the country who do not have access to such fresh produce. In states where hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is underway, farmers’ livelihoods and the food system they support are threatened. We must send a strong message to Governor Cuomo, demanding that he stop this dangerous practice from undermining our own food systems by banning fracking in our state.
 
Fracking is the process of injecting a mixture of water, sand and chemicals into wells at high pressure to crack dense rock formations and release oil or gas. Up to 75 percent of the millions of gallons of water that is required per well ends up back on the surface as waste water, contaminated with toxic chemicals as well as other naturally occurring pollutants and radioactive material. This fluid can leak into the water supplies of residents and farmers, which happens as a result of frequent accidents and normal operations. The consequences are dire. These toxins contaminate the soil, poison livestock, and pollute the air, while methane emissions contribute to climate change. All of this results in decreased productivity of farmers’ fields and livestock while lowering their property value and threatening the safety of locally grown food.
 
Governor Cuomo is considering allowing fracking in regions where farming is central to the local economy. In the Southern Tier, for example, dairy products make up two-thirds of agricultural sales. In Pennsylvania, counties with dairy farms that had at least 150 fracking wells experienced a 16% decline in their dairy productivity, compared to regions without fracking wells, which experienced a 3% increase in productivity.
 
Because of the clear dangers of fracking, the movement to ban it is gaining momentum. Hundreds of farmers, brewers, vintners and chefs, including Mario Batali of The Food Network, and over 1,000 businesses and 242 organizations have joined the coalition New Yorkers Against Fracking. Despite this, Governor Cuomo has not yet made up his mind, so it is imperative that we keep fighting.
 
There are numerous ways to get involved. Food & Water Watch and New Yorkers Against Fracking are planning rallies throughout the summer, and the more people at those rallies the more likely Governor Cuomo is to pay attention. Anyone can write a letter to the editor of local, state and national newspapers to speak out against the dangerous practice and encourage others to do the same. In addition, we are constantly collecting and delivering petitions to Governor Cuomo, a powerful tactic in which everyone can participate. If you are interested in participating in any of these actions, we would love to hear from you! Feel free to reach out using the contact info below.
 
Fracking is exceptionally damaging to our water, air, and soil. If these are contaminated, the food we eat will be as well. If we are going to continue to enjoy fresh, local vegetables, we must urge Governor Cuomo to ban fracking now!
 
Jessica Wohlander, MA is an activist with Food & Water Watch, a nonprofit consumer organization with offices in Brooklyn (www.FoodandWaterWatch.org).  To get involved, contact Jessica at jwohlander@fwwlocal.org.
 
 

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Copyright © 2014 Lineage Farm CSA, All rights reserved.
Thanks for joining our CSA for the 2014 season!

Our mailing address is:

Lineage Farm CSA
520 Clinton St.

Hudson, Ny 12534

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Special Release – Maple Syrup now available for Lineage Farm CSA members!


Twinkle Twinkle little star…
 
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Lineage Farm CSA

Special Release -

Now taking Maple Syrup Orders!

Dear Friends, Neighbors, and CSA Members,

Circle C Maple Syrup Farmers are again offering Lineage Farm CSA Members a share of their Syrup Bounty.  See below for their descriptions and prices.  Place your orders with us, checks made out to Lineage Farm, and we will deliver your Maple Syrup in early August.

We are also speaking with Flower Farmer Angela DeFelice of Sol Flower Farm, with the potential of a flower bouquet share add-on for the rest of the season!  Stay tuned for more of this lovely news.
 

Your farmers,
Jen, Jon, and Garlicky Sam

 

We are teaming up with Circle C Maple Farm to offer you Maple Syrup Shares.

The Circle C Syrup Farmers are again offering various sizes, from 12 oz bottles to Gallon size bottles, of both Grade A and Grade B Maple Syrup, straight from their Hudson Valley Maple farm to you!  Visit Circle C's Maple Syrup Page to read more about their farm and their syrup!

Order by July 30th, by emailing Jen Ronsani of Lineage Farm at lineagefarm@riseup.net, and send a check made out to Lineage Farm, with size and grade desired written in the memo section.  Mail to:

Lineage Farm
520 Clinton St.
Hudson NY 12534
 

Syrup will be delivered to your regular vegetable pick up site in early August.

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Copyright © 2014 Lineage Farm CSA, All rights reserved.
Thanks for joining our CSA for the 2014 season!

Our mailing address is:

Lineage Farm CSA
520 Clinton St.

Hudson, Ny 12534

Lineage Farm CSA Newsletter #7

Twinkle Twinkle little star…
View this email in your browser

Lineage Farm CSA

July 19th

week seven
(4 pm start in Poughkeepsie this week)

Brooklyn:
Saturday June 7th
10:30-12:30
at the
Greenpoint Reformed Church
136 Milton Street, Greenpoint NY

White Plains:
Saturdays
10-12pm
at the
White Plains Presbyterian Church
39 N. Broadway

Scarsdale:
Tuesdays 6/17, 7/1, 7/15, 7/29, 8/12, and 8/26
4:30-7pm
at the
Hitchcock Presbyterian Church,
6 Greenacres Avenue,
Scarsdale, NY 10583

Poughkeepsie:
Tuesdays
4-6:30pm
at the
Jewish Community Center
Grand Avenue
Poughkeepsie, NY

Hudson:
Wednesdays
4:30 to 5:30pm
at
Sam Sutty’s and Son
713 Warren St
Hudson, NY 12534

This week’s share (subject to change) – 
Yukina Savoy (like a summery, savoyed tat soi), Beets, Carrots, Summer Squash, Zucchini, Patty Pan Squash, Cucumbers galore, various Herbs, and more!

Dear Friends, Neighbors, and CSA Members,

The tomatoes are so tall now, I can barely reach up to twine the vine around the trellis.  The plants are heavy with fruit, and several in the lowest bunches starting their first blush.  Sam played for a bit with a green tomato he was able to grab, but no interest in eating it.  Perhaps if it was breaded and fried… 

Remember those eggplants I mentioned recently, expected to swell in the first week of August?  Well, we’re a bit ahead of schedule, and I see many that are going to be harvestable this coming week.  I do love all these deliciously grillable summer fruits.  I haven’t tried grilling cucumbers, though maybe I should, since I’ve heard claims of pineapples being grill-worthy.  Zucchini and eggplants are my mainstay through the hot August days.  Not that it’s been so hot up here.  Oddly cool nights for July, in the 50s, have me doubly surprised to see the eggplants ready so soon.  We did cover them early on with that light weight spun fabric row cover, so I suspect the extra bit of heat in their youth gave them a boost.  Hopefully there’s no damage from the nightly 50s.

We’re trying out a new pepper this year, along with our standard bells and Italian fryers – Shishito peppers will come to grace your pick up tables soon, a skinny thin walled green pepper that scalds easily, making it great for grilling, sauteeing hole, or broiling, for a tasty treat.  I’ve heard it refered to as better than french fries, and a great finger food to impress your friends at your next hors d’oeuvres party.

I’m going to try to figure out how to invite all of you to the new(ish) Facebook Group – or if you have another idea for how all members can converse online, to swap recipes and ask questions, please fill me in!  I’m wondering, what’s your favorite cookbook these days?  Mine is Nourished Kitchens.  Lovely salad and vegetable and ferment recipes, and I just made the most delicious Cider Brined Roast Chicken of my life last night.  What have you made recently?

With a second tooth,
Your farmers,
Jen, Jon, and Baby Sam

Roasted Beet Hummus
Super creamy roasted beet hummus featuring a whole roasted beet, lemon, plenty of garlic flavor. Perfect with chips, pita, veggies or as a sandwich spread.

Serves: 6
Ingredients
  • 1 small roasted beet
  • 1 15 oz. can (1 3/4 cup) cooked chickpeas, mostly drained
  • zest of one large lemon
  • juice of half a large lemon
  • healthy pinch salt and black pepper
  • 2 large cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 heaping Tbsp tahini
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375°F, remove the stem and most of the root from your beets, and scrub and wash them underwater until clean.
  2. Wrap beets in foil, drizzle on a bit of canola oil, wrap tightly, and roast for one hour or until a knife inserted falls out without resistance. They should be tender. Set in the fridge (in a bowl to catch juice) to cool to room temperature.
  3. Once your beet is cooled and peeled, quarter it and place it in your food processor. Blend until only small bits remain.
  4. Add remaining ingredients except for olive oil and blend until smooth.
  5. Drizzle in olive oil as the hummus is mixing.
  6. Taste and adjust seasonings as needed, adding more salt, lemon juice or olive oil if needed. If it’s too thick, add a bit of water.
  7. Will keep in the fridge for up to a week.

Vegan Beet Cupcakes
Fudgy vegan cupcakes with pureed roasted beets and a dusting of cocoa powder.
Author: Minimalist Baker

 

Serves: 10 cupcakes
Ingredients
  • 2 medium beets
  • 1 cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk
  • 1 tsp white or apple cider vinegar
  • 
3/4 cup raw turbinado OR granulated sugar
  • 1/4 cup canola or melted coconut oil
  • 2 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • 1 cup + 1 heaping Tbsp whole wheat pastry flour or unbleached all-purpose flour
  • scant 1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
 + more for topping
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • pinch salt
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375°F, remove the stem and most of the root from your beets, and scrub and wash them underwater until clean.
  2. Wrap beets in foil, drizzle on a bit of canola oil, wrap tightly, and roast for one hour or until a knife inserted falls out without resistance. They should be tender. Set in the fridge (in a bowl to catch juice) to cool to room temperature.
  3. Once cooled, either finely grate or puree beets in a blender (adding orange juice or water to encourage mixing). Measure out 1/2 cup and set aside.
  4. Line a muffin pan with paper liners.
  5. Whisk together the almond milk and vinegar in a large bowl, and set aside for a few minutes to curdle. Add the sugar, oil, vanilla extract, and 1/2 cup beets and beat until foamy.
  6. Add the flour, cocoa powder, baking soda, baking powder, and salt to a sifter and slowly sift it into the wet ingredients while mixing with a hand-held or standing mixer. Beat until no large lumps remain.
  7. Pour batter into liners, filling 3/4 of the way full. Bake 22 to 25 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Transfer to a cooling rack and let cool completely. Do not try and unwrap them or they’ll stick to the wrapper.
  8. Once cooled, dust with cocoa powder and store in an airtight container to keep fresh.
Tzatziki/Cucumber Dill Yogurt Sauce

  • 2 cups plain yogurt
  • 1 cucumber, unpeeled, halved lengthwise, seeded, grated
  • 1 tablespoon coarse salt
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons minced fresh dill
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 6 pita breads, cut horizontally in half, then cut into wedges
  • Olive oil

Preparation

Line sieve with cheesecloth and place over medium bowl. Place yogurt in sieve. Cover with plastic wrap and allow to drain in refrigerator overnight.

Mix cucumber and 1 tablespoon salt in small bowl; cover and chill 3 hours.

Transfer drained yogurt to another bowl. Mix in sour cream, lemon juice, dill and garlic. Squeeze out as much excess liquid as possible from cucumber. Stir cucumber into yogurt. Season with pepper. Cover; chill at least 2 hours. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Keep refrigerated.)

Preheat oven to 400°F. Place pita wedges on baking sheets. Brush with olive oil. Bake until crisp, about 10 minutes. Cool. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Store pita airtight at room temperature.) Serve cucumber dip with baked pita wedges.

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Copyright © 2014 Lineage Farm CSA, All rights reserved.
Thanks for joining our CSA for the 2014 season!Our mailing address is:

Lineage Farm CSA

520 Clinton St.

Hudson, Ny 12534


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