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Lineage Farm CSA Newsletter #13


Ch-ch-ch-ch-changes
Diaper Change Again
Ch-ch-changes
Smells like we're gonna have to do another diaper change…
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Lineage Farm CSA

August 28th

week thirteen!!!
(4 pm start in Poughkeepsie this week)

Brooklyn:
Saturday June 7th
10:30-12:30
at the
Greenpoint Reformed Church
136 Milton Street, Greenpoint NY

White Plains:
Saturdays
10-12pm
at the
White Plains Presbyterian Church
39 N. Broadway

Scarsdale:
Tuesdays 6/17, 7/1, 7/15, 7/29, 8/12, and 8/26
4:30-7pm
at the
Hitchcock Presbyterian Church,
6 Greenacres Avenue,
Scarsdale, NY 10583

Poughkeepsie:
Tuesdays
 4-6:30pm
at the
Jewish Community Center
Grand Avenue
Poughkeepsie, NY

Hudson:
Wednesdays
4:30 to 5:30pm
at
Sam Sutty's and Son
713 Warren St
Hudson, NY 12534

This Week's Harvest:
Tomatoes, Summer Squash, Eggplants, Peppers of various sorts, Carrots, Beets, Salad Radishes, Beans, Herbs, and more!

Dear CSA Members, Neighbors, Friends, Family,
Change is in the air.  In the past couple weeks, I've been spotting those initial tiny bursts of flaming color appearing in this tree, on that branch.  It never ceases to surprise me to see burning orange Maple leaves in mid August.  And now, with August very nearly over, the patches of color are slowly spreading to include a few yellows and crimsons.  Not to worry, though – there is still plenty of summertime green, and the height of fall color generally holds off until mid-October.  The nights have been a steady low 60s of late, with daily highs holding in the sunny low 80s. 

 

One lovely late summer phenomenon greeted us in the early mornings last week, as we drove to the farm through such dense fog one could not see a full 20 feet ahead.  Warm soil and cool air, perhaps?  I would share a photo, but it just looks white!
 

The Delicata and Sweet Dumpling Squash are safely cured and tucked away, awaiting your culinary delight in the coming weeks.  The Acorn Squash have been cut from their dying vines, and await our gathering them from the fields.  Delicatas are generally ready to eat first, while Acorns require a few weeks curing before their sweetness arises, and Butternuts take longest of all that we grow.  The Butternuts are just now ready to be cut from their vines, then to keep and feed us all well through the winter (depending on how long you hold off from eating yours!).  There are varieties, though we do not grow them, that only mature in flavor after months of storage.  I always get a craving to grow a wide and wild variety of winter squashes; their flavor profile descriptions just reel me in the way tomatoes get most people.  We did a trial patch of White Cushaw this year, a couple dozen plants, and you might run in to a few of these large white-ish squash come November – purported to have an aroma of pumpkin and cantaloupe, with superb sweet orange flesh, I'm really looking forward to cutting one open.
 

Sam was happily crawling along the sandy pathways this week, as I pulled and topped a bed of beets to save them from foraging deer.  Apparently he does not appreciate summer squash harvest, though, as that turned into a grumpy endeavor.  Probably just my timing, really – pushing to finish a task when he was ready for another nap.  He is also working on another top tooth – his fifth already! and it seems like he just started cutting teeth a few weeks ago.  Which I guess, he did. 
 

full harvest!

The summer is absolutely flying by for me, this year.  After this week, only 10 distributions remain!  I am working up a mid-season survey for y'all to tell me about your experiences with us as your farmers.  Please be candid, and wordy, as that is the a great way we figure out how to improve!

Your farmers,
Jen, Jon, and Baby Sam

 

Debbie's Borscht Recipe (see below for another recipe, too)
4 large beets, washed, peeled and chopped in large chunks
1 med. Onion, peeled and chopped
5 cups cold water
1 tsp. salt
1 1/2 Tbl. Sugar
Juice of 1/2 lemon
Optional garnish:  sour cream, yoghurt, chopped chives
 
Put beets, onion, water in 3 quart pot.  
Bring to boil, simmering for about 15-20 min, skimming as foam rises.
Add salt, sugar, lemon juice and remove from heat and puree.
 
Can be served cold or hot (with diced cooked potatoes instead of sour cream or yoghurt).

And bonus -
Debbie's Tomato Leek Soup Recipe
(she says this one is excellent frozen for winter eating)
 

2 Tbl. olive oil
2 leeks, mostly white parts, chopped (about 1 cup)
1 large clove garlic. crushed
2 lbs. fresh tomatoes, coarsely chopped, about 4 cups
6 oz. can tomato paste
5 3/8 cups broth
1 Tbl. chopped fresh basil
1 bay leaf
Salt and pepper to taste
 
Heat oil in 4 qt. saucepan.  Add leeks and garlic.  Cook 5 min., stirring frequently
Add tomatoes and paste.  Cook 5 minutes, stirring often.
Add broth and seasonings and bring to a boil.
Reduce heat and simmer uncovered 20 min.
Remove from heat and remove bay leaf.
Puree.  (I use a food mill to take out the tomato skins.)
May be served cold or hot.
 
Makes 8-10 servings.

 

 

Parable

First divesting ourselves of worldly goods, as St. Francis teaches,
in order that our souls not be distracted
by gain and loss, and in order also
that our bodies be free to move
easily at the mountain passes, we had then to discuss
whither or where we might travel, with the second question being
should we have a purpose, against which
many of us argued fiercely that such purpose
corresponded to worldly goods, meaning a limitation or constriction,
whereas others said it was by this word we were consecrated
pilgrims rather than wanderers: in our minds, the word translated as
a dream, a something-sought, so that by concentrating we might see it
glimmering among the stones, and not
pass blindly by; each
further issue we debated equally fully, the arguments going back and forth,
so that we grew, some said, less flexible and more resigned,
like soldiers in a useless war. And snow fell upon us, and wind blew,
which in time abated — where the snow had been, many flowers appeared,
and where the stars had shone, the sun rose over the tree line
so that we had shadows again; many times this happened.
Also rain, also flooding sometimes, also avalanches, in which
some of us were lost, and periodically we would seem
to have achieved an agreement; our canteens
hoisted upon our shoulders, but always that moment passed, so
(after many years) we were still at that first stage, still
preparing to begin a journey, but we were changed nevertheless;
we could see this in one another; we had changed although
we never moved, and one said, ah, behold how we have aged, traveling
from day to night only, neither forward nor sideward, and this seemed
in a strange way miraculous. And those who believed we should have a purpose
believed this was the purpose, and those who felt we must remain free
in order to encounter truth, felt it had been revealed.

— LOUISE GLÜCK, winner of the Pulitzer Prize and author, most recently, of “A Village Life”

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Copyright © 2014 Lineage Farm CSA, All rights reserved.
Thanks for joining our CSA for the 2014 season!

Our mailing address is:

Lineage Farm CSA
520 Clinton St.

Hudson, Ny 12534

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Lineage Farm CSA Newsletter #12


Now it's time to say Good Night
Good Night, Sleep Tight.
Now, the Sun turns out his Light
Good Night, Sleeep Tight…
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Lineage Farm CSA

August 22nd

week twelve!!!
(early 3 pm start in Poughkeepsie this week)

Brooklyn:
Saturday June 7th
10:30-12:30
at the
Greenpoint Reformed Church
136 Milton Street, Greenpoint NY

White Plains:
Saturdays
10-12pm
at the
White Plains Presbyterian Church
39 N. Broadway

Scarsdale:
Tuesdays 6/17, 7/1, 7/15, 7/29, 8/12, and 8/26
4:30-7pm
at the
Hitchcock Presbyterian Church,
6 Greenacres Avenue,
Scarsdale, NY 10583

Poughkeepsie:
Tuesdays
 4-6:30pm
at the
Jewish Community Center
Grand Avenue
Poughkeepsie, NY

Hudson:
Wednesdays
4:30 to 5:30pm
at
Sam Sutty's and Son
713 Warren St
Hudson, NY 12534

This Week's Harvest:
Leeks!, Tomatoes!, Hooligan Squash! Eggplants, Peppers of various sorts, Carrots, Beets, Summer Squash, Cucumbers, Herbs, and more!

Dear Friends, Neighbors, CSA Members

Done!  The very last transplants of the season are in the ground, and the greenhouse is officially transformed from the place plants start out their lives to the curing zone.  Garlic is already cured, with dry skin protecting the cloves.  Onions – Rossa Lunga (elongated red), Dakota Tears (yellow), and Cabernet (red) now deck the tables, necks drying down and skins curing.  Next up, all those tasty Delicatas, Acorns, and other small "Autumn" Squashes, piling in from the fields, and the season of squash will be rounded off with the larger Butternuts and Cushaws.

Sam had a long and fruitful week – and I'm not only referring to his enjoyment of pears and melons.  He just cut his two top front teeth, and he's crawling!  Amazing how in just a few days so much changes.  He is thrilled to have increased his mobility, though he's not going too far, too fast quite yet.  He also enjoyed helping us weed the rutabagas, fall cabbages, and collard greens.

The refreshing fall array of brassicas are now pushing up under the row cover – rows of arugula, hakurei turnips, and radishes will soon be harvestable.  In case I forget to include it in a future newsletter, look up arugula salad with roasted winter squash, it was a big hit with Jon's family last year. 

The gradual process of garden clean up has begun – Jon has mowed down several aging beds, clearing space for the over wintering cover crops.  We've spread rye and clover seed on a good portion of the garden, and will soon be spreading field peas and oats as well.  The grains, seeded heavily, will provide a goodly amount of biomass, and the legumes will fix nitrogen, and together they will smother weeds, adding up to more fertility and lower weed pressure in the future.

Who else is pumped about these celeriac?

Next week the assessor will check out that property we are interested in acquiring.   After that, we figure out what we will offer.  Keep your fingers crossed for us!

Dreaming sweet dreams,
Your farmers,
Jen, Jon, and Baby Sam

Leek and Swiss Chard Tart
ingredients

  • 1 sheet frozen puff pastry (half of 17.3-ounce package), thawed
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 3 large leeks (white and pale green parts only), coarsely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/2 bunch Swiss chard, ribs removed, leaves chopped (about 2 1/2 cups)
  • 1 1/4 cups whipping cream
  • 3 large eggs
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • Pinch of ground nutmeg

preparation

Roll out pastry on floured work surface to 12-inch square. Transfer to 9-inch-diameter glass pie dish. Trim overhang to 1 inch. Fold under; crimp edges. Cover; chill.

Melt butter in large skillet over medium-low heat. Add leeks and thyme. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Cover; cook until leeks are very tender but not brown, stirring often, about 10 minutes. Add chard; saute until wilted, about 2 minutes. Remove from heat; cool.

Position rack in bottom third of oven; preheat to 425°F. Whisk cream and next 5 ingredients in large bowl. Mix in cooled leek mixture. Pour filling into crust.

Bake tart 15 minutes. Reduce heat to 350°F and bake until filling is puffed and just set in center, about 15 minutes longer. Transfer to rack; cool 10 minutes.

SONNET 18

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimm'd;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st;
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

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Copyright © 2014 Lineage Farm CSA, All rights reserved.
Thanks for joining our CSA for the 2014 season!

Our mailing address is:

Lineage Farm CSA
520 Clinton St.

Hudson, Ny 12534


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