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Lineage Farm’s March Newsletter


anybody got a good instagram name for baby photos of Sam?
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Lineage Farm
CSA

March!

Dear Friends, Neighbors, and CSA Members,

 Spring!  While the tulip and dandelion shoots are still a few weeks off, the warmth of the sun through the greenhouse leads me to dream of their imminent emergence.  Our onion, scallion, and leek seedlings are starting their seasonal ballet dance, sending up an initial knee to test the greenhouse's warmth, followed by an uncurling of their toe to point towards the sky.  These alliums are joined now by lettuce, kale, cabbage, and herb seedlings, and the soon to emerge solanums – eggplants, tomatoes, and peppers.

Our new hoop house arrived last Friday, its skeleton lays now in pieces by its future site.  We will erect this unheated greenhouse in the next couple weeks, the future home of this season's solanaceae after they grow to transplanting stage in the seedling greenhouse.  While we are not participating in any farmers markets, which is the general incentive for farmers to invest in tomato hoop houses as they offer the chance to provide (moneymaking) early and late tomatoes, we consider this a sound investment for our membership, knowing how many of you loved our tomatoes last season – this season we may be able to offer them for so much longer! 

Jon has trekked out nightly for the past three weeks, ever since we placed this season's first seeds in potting soil, to light the greenhouse fire.  Even on the coldest nights, our woodstove provides warmth, and thereby supports life, for our seedlings.  So far, I've stayed at home while he's out working the fire, learning new daily rhythms such as 7:30pm bedtimes for Sam. 

As of yet, the ground remains either too soggy or too snowy to approach it with any of our tractor implements, so we, along with all the other Hudson area farmers, are holding off on creating our beds.  Theoretically, we will be putting parsnip and carrot seeds in the ground next week, but don't expect too much of a delay if we push that date back a week.  Soon after that we will be laying down spinach and komatsuna, radishes and arugula, tat soi and white salad turnips – the essential early season bounty.  Take a bite, and plan the coming six months of seasonal meals around fresh Lineage Farm vegetables!  Visit our website, http://www.lineagefarmcsa.com/signup for brochures and commitment forms.

Through the bluster and the coming spring rains,
Your Farmers,
Jen and Jon

 

"I suggest that a prerequisite for gaining a living relation to the world as human beings is the ability to open ourselves through attentive perception. This living relation begins when we go out, actively and yet in the mode of receptivity, take in, and then engage with what we discover. In the process we become beings of place, even if we are on the move. We are attending to and taking in some of what the world offers up. In contrast, we are placeless when we are caught up with or consumed with ourselves, when we notice only what we have known before. If we want to open ourselves and root ourselves in the world in a living way we need to develop pathways to get out into experience, to become more conscious of immediate experience, and to learn to work with our ideas in such a way that they do not place barriers between ourselves and the richness of the world."
 
Craig Holdrege Thinking Like a Plant
 
 

Copyright © 2014 Lineage Farm CSA, All rights reserved.
Thank you for joining our Vegetable CSA with Lineage Farm!
Our mailing address is:
Lineage Farm CSA
520 Clinton St.

Hudson, Ny 12534

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Lineage Farm CSA February Newsletter

the warmth of working
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Lineage Farm
CSA

February!

Coming soon, to a site near you…

This week’s “harvest” - 
Rutabagas, Potatoes, Beets, Carrots (lots and lots of carrots) – $1.50/pound for members – call or email to order – pick up in Hudson – meet Sam!

Dear Friends, Neighbors, and CSA Members,

A few weeks ago, as Jon and I were in the throes of shoe repair, one may have mistaken the rainy thawing days as springtime.  The birds were trilling, the ground was soggy, the days were almost warm.  Remember that?  These days, it’s back to bundling up before heading outside.  Jon’s got his balaclava on permanently, and Sam practically lives in his multitude of woolen layers.  Snow covers the soil, a crystalline blanket with its own timetable, offering us the seasonal respite most Southerners miss out on (though it sounds like my parents in Georgia have had quite the icy time this year).  

Despite all that, the season is pretty much upon us.  Plans have been planned, maps have been mapped, seeds have been, well, bought.  And in a couple weeks, seeds will have been seeded!  Indeed, regardless of the state of snow cover, the end of February and beginning of March marks the time to start our onions, leeks, celery, and so much more.  The firewood for our greenhouse’s wood stove will be stacked and ready to go any day now, the plastic will have been patched, and all the seedling tables will be in a row.  And level.  Leveling the tables (since we can’t level the ground at this point) is Jon’s current task, taking him out into the glorious sun drenched greenhouse for the day as Sam and I hang out at home, finalizing garden plans, dreaming up marketing ideas, and trying to put our house in order one-handed and holding a baby.  We just moved back in to Hudson, where Jon did quite a bit of work the last few months, clearing out  the old, the moldy, and the lead-based for the new, the baby, and the Sam-based.  

 

Please do sign up early, as early as your budgetary time-table allows.  Simply sending us a note or email with a deposit allows us to monitor whether or not our planned budget is based in reality.  With three potential new sites this season – one in White Plains, one in the Capital District, and one in Scarsdale – we are hoping to increase membership by half.  If you have friends in any of those locations, tell them about us!  The Capital District site is in collaboration with R’Eisen Shine Farm (read about it on their Feb. 3rd blog), and the Scarsdale site starts in the fall, and is in collaboration with Mountain Brook Farm, since Farmer Hilary grew up there.  Both will be bi-weekly, so only “half” shares are available – 8-9 choices every other week.  White Plains is in collaboration with Reverend Sarah Henkel of the White Plains Presbyterian Church (find the White Plains brochure here).  We are very excited to be working with all three collaborators, old and new friends alike.

 

To sign up for the upcoming season, please visit our sign up page on our website, www.lineagefarmcsa.com/signup.  We look forward to seeing you!

 

From the icy snow forts and the warming greenhouse,
Your Farmers,
Jen and Jon

From soil to salad bowl (and other bowls, besides)

Similar in appearance to turnips, the rutabaga has yellow-orange flesh and ridges at its neck.RutabagaAlthough this beta carotene-rich vegetable has been grown and marketed in our country for nearly 200 years, it remains an uncommon food in American dining. It carries a delicate sweetness and flavor that hints of the light freshness of cabbage and turnip. With its easy preparation and versatility, great nutrition, and excellent flavor, the rutabaga can easily become an endearing family favorite.

Because rutabagas store so well, up to one month in the refrigerator and up to four months in commercial storage at 32 degrees, they are available year round. Planted in June, they’re harvested in late summer and early fall when their flavor is at its peak.

Preparing Rutabagas
There are at least 100 ways to enjoy rutabagas. Here are a just few suggestions to introduce this wonderful vegetable:

RAW: First, peel them with a vegetable peeler. Slice and enjoy as a snack. Chop, dice, or grate them and add to salads. Create a unique salad with diced rutabagas and other vegetables of your choice. Grate them and add to cole slaw. Grate and combine with carrot salad.

COOKED: Rutabagas can be roasted, boiled, steamed, stir-fried, mashed, or stewed. Cook them with potatoes and mash together. Quarter them and roast along with potatoes. Enhance the flavor of stews with chopped or quartered rutabagas. Dice them and add to soups. Stir-fry with onions.

Dust of Snow
 by Robert Frost    
The way a crow
Shook down on me
The dust of snow
From a hemlock tree

Has given my heart
A change of mood
And saved some part
Of a day I had rued.

Copyright © 2014 Lineage Farm CSA, All rights reserved.
Thank you for joining our Vegetable CSA with Lineage Farm!
Our mailing address is:

Lineage Farm CSA

520 Clinton St.

Hudson, Ny 12534

Add us to your address book

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